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McGuinn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Irish name McGuinn was originally written in a Gaelic form as O Cuinn, which means descendant of Conn.

Early Origins of the McGuinn family


The surname McGuinn was first found in county Longford (Irish: An Longfort) traditionally known as Annaly or Teffia, and situated in the Irish Midlands, in Northwest Leinster where they were Lords of Muintir Gillagain. The O'Quinns and MacQuinns (and all of the spelling variables derived from these) were descended from Conn, who in turn was descended from the Princes of Annaly.

Early History of the McGuinn family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McGuinn research.
Another 278 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1014, 1252, 1279, 1281, 1522, 1551, 1645, and 1726 are included under the topic Early McGuinn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McGuinn Spelling Variations


The recording of names in Ireland during the Middle Ages was an inconsistent endeavor at best. Since the general population did not know how to read or write, they could only specify how their names should be recorded orally. Research into the name McGuinn revealed spelling variations, including O'Quinn, Quin, Quinn, Quine, MacQuin, MacQuinn, McQuin, McQuinn, MacCuin, Cuinn, Cuin and many more.

Early Notables of the McGuinn family (pre 1700)


Another 45 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McGuinn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McGuinn family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McGuinn Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Mary McGuinn, aged 28, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Dorcas Savage" from Belfast, Ireland
  • Mr. William McGuinn, aged 4 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Broom" departing from the port of Liverpool, England but died on Grosse Isle in August 1847 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 44)
  • Miss. Ann McGuinn, aged 11 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "John Bolton" departing 13th April 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 10th June 1847 but she died on board [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 87)

McGuinn Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • James Mc Guinn, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Wanganui" in 1882

Contemporary Notables of the name McGuinn (post 1700)


  • J. J. McGuinn, American politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 24th District, 1918 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

McGuinn Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 44)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 87)
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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