× Home
×

Family Crest and History Search
House of Names
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2016


McEntire is a name that evolved among the descendants of the people of the kingdom of Dalriada in ancient Scotland. It is a name for a person who worked as a carpenter or wright. The Gaelic form Mac an t-saoir means son of the carpenter. Most historians agree that their earliest habitations were on MacDonald territories on Kintyre. Most legends about their beginnings point to an origin in the Hebrides. From this point on, opinions differ. One legend has the Clan-an-t-Saor (Children of the Carpenter) arriving in Lorne in a galley with a white cow, another says that the galley, set adrift, developed a leak below the water line and the MacDonald Chieftain placed his thumb in the hole to keep the boat afloat. Spotting help at a distance, he cut off his thumb so that he could wave. He was ironically named the Carpenter or MacIntyre. Some claim that the family derived its name from a member of the MacDonalds who was called Cean-tire because of his ownership of lands on the peninsula of Kintyre.

McEntire Early Origins



The surname McEntire was first found in Argyllshire (Gaelic erra Ghaidheal), the region of western Scotland corresponding roughly with the ancient Kingdom of Dál Riata, in the Strathclyde region of Scotland, now part of the Council Area of Argyll and Bute, where according legend, Maurice or Murdock, The Wright, (c.1150) became the first MacIntyre chief as a reward for helping his uncle, Somerled, King of Argyll and the Western Isles.

Close

McEntire Spelling Variations


Expand

McEntire Spelling Variations



Spelling and translation were not standardized practices until the last few centuries. Spelling variations are extremely common among early Scottish names. McEntire has been spelled MacIntyre, MacIntire, MacIntre and many more.

Close

McEntire Early History


Expand

McEntire Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McEntire research. Another 361 words (26 lines of text) covering the years 1955 and 1991 are included under the topic Early McEntire History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

McEntire Early Notables (pre 1700)


Expand

McEntire Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 25 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McEntire Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

McEntire In Ireland


Expand

McEntire In Ireland



Some of the McEntire family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 105 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

The Great Migration


Expand

The Great Migration



Scottish settlers arrived in many of the communities that became the backbones of the United States and Canada. Many stayed, but some headed west for the endless open country of the prairies. In the American War of Independence, many Scots who remained loyal to England re-settled in Canada as United Empire Loyalists. Scots across North America were able to recover much of their lost heritage in the 20th century as Clan societies and highland games sprang up across North Ameri ca. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first McEntires to arrive on North American shores:

McEntire Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Mrs. McEntire, aged 22, landed in Norfolk, Va in 1803
  • George McEntire, who arrived in Norfolk, Va in 1803
  • Mary McEntire, aged 20, landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1805
  • Sally McEntire, aged 20, arrived in New York, NY in 1850
  • Aleseander McEntire, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1855

McEntire Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Jos McEntire, who arrived in Canada in 1817
  • Ann McEntire, aged 20, arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Edward Reid" in 1833
  • Alexander McEntire, aged 18, landed in Quebec in 1833
  • Jane McEntire, aged 6, landed in Quebec in 1833
  • John McEntire, aged 20, arrived in Quebec in 1833

McEntire Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Edward McEntire, aged 27, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship "Marshall Bennett"

Close

Contemporary Notables of the name McEntire (post 1700)


Expand

Contemporary Notables of the name McEntire (post 1700)



  • Reba Nell McEntire (b. 1955), American country music singer, performer and Golden Globe Award nominated actress often named "The Queen of Country" having sold 57 million records
  • Clark Stephen McEntire (1928-2014), American father of Reba, Pake and Martha McEntire
  • Martha Susan "Susie" McEntire -Eaton (b. 1957), American country music singer, younger sister of Reba McEntire
  • Brigadier General Barnie B. McEntire Jr., American first commander of the SCANG, eponym of McEntire Joint National Guard Base
  • Dale Stanley "Pake" McEntire (b. 1953), American country music artist, oldest brother of Reba McEntire
  • John McEntire (b. 1970), American drummer and multi-instrumentalist

Close

Motto


Expand

Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Per ardua
Motto Translation: Through difficulties.


Close

McEntire Family Crest Products


Expand

McEntire Family Crest Products




Close

See Also


Expand

See Also




Close

Citations


Expand

Citations



    Other References

    1. Adam, Frank. Clans Septs and Regiments of the Scottish Highlands 8th Edition. London: Bacon (G.W.) & Co, 1970. Print. (ISBN 10-0717945006).
    2. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    3. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and David Hicks. The Highland Clans The Dynastic Origins, Cheifs and Background of the Clans. New York: C.N. Potter, 1968. Print.
    4. Moody David. Scottish Family History. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0806312688).
    5. Paul, Sir James Balfour. An Ordinary of Arms Contained in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland Second Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1903. Print.
    6. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Scots Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Mordern Application of the Art and Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
    7. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
    8. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
    9. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
    10. Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3).
    11. ...

    The McEntire Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The McEntire Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 16 June 2016 at 07:25.

    Sign Up

      


    FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
    House of Names on Facebook
    Follow Houseofnames on Twitter
    Houseofnames on Pinterest