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McDermid History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Hebrides islands and the west coast of Scotland are the ancestral home of the McDermid family. Their name comes from the personal name Dermid which is derived from the Gaelic Mac Dhiarmaid, which means son of Dermid.


Early Origins of the McDermid family


The surname McDermid was first found in Perthshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Pheairt) former county in the present day Council Area of Perth and Kinross, located in central Scotland, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the McDermid family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McDermid research.
Another 99 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McDermid History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McDermid Spelling Variations


Medieval translation of Gaelic names could not be referred to as an accurate process. Spelling was not yet standardized, and names in documents from that era are riddled with spelling variations. McDermid has been written as MacDairmid, MacDermid, MacDiarmid, MacDarmid, MacDearmid, MacDermaid, MacDermont and many more.

Early Notables of the McDermid family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early McDermid Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McDermid family to the New World and Oceana


Ancestors of many of the Dalriadan families who crossed the Atlantic still live along the east coast of the United States and Canada. Some Scottish settlers arrived in Canada during the American War of Independence as United Empire Loyalists, while others stayed south to fight for a new nation. The descendants of Scottish settlers in both countries began to rediscover their heritage in the 19th and 20th centuries through Clan societies and highland games. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name McDermid or a variant listed above:

McDermid Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Robert McDermid, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1842 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • Susan McDermid, aged 20, who landed in America from Tyrone, in 1898

McDermid Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • John E. McDermid, aged 25, who settled in America from Seaford, England, in 1918
  • Margaret McDermid, aged 20, who immigrated to the United States from Larkhall, Scotland, in 1921
  • Agnes McDermid, aged 9, who immigrated to the United States from Larkhall, Scotland, in 1921
  • Daniel McDermid, aged 7, who landed in America from Larkhall, Scotland, in 1921
  • Jeanie McDermid, aged 2, who immigrated to the United States from Larkhall, Scotland, in 1921
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

McDermid Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century

  • Edward Blake McDermid, aged 46, who immigrated to Vancouver, Canada, in 1916

McDermid Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Margaret McDermid, aged 33, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Aliquis"
  • Ann McDermid, aged 20, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship "North"

McDermid Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Hugh McDermid, aged 28, a wright, who arrived in Otago aboard the ship "Philip Laing" in 1848
  • Margaret McDermid, aged 20, who arrived in Otago aboard the ship "Philip Laing" in 1848
  • Mr. Francis McDermid, Scottish settler travelling from Greenock aboard the ship "Philip Laing" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 15th April 1848 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • Mr. William McDermid, Scottish settler travelling from Greenock aboard the ship "Philip Laing" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 15th April 1848 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • Mr. Hugh McDermid, Scottish settler travelling from Greenock aboard the ship "Philip Laing" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 15th April 1848 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name McDermid (post 1700)


  • Bob McDermid (1895-1952), Scottish footballer who played from 1917 to 1933
  • Val McDermid (b. 1955), Scottish crime writer, best known for her suspense novels starring Dr. Tony Hill
  • John McDermid (b. 1940), former Canadian politician, Member of Parliament for Brampton–Georgetown (1979-1988), Member of Parliament for Brampton (1988-1993)
  • Sally McDermid (b. 1965), Australian two-time bronze medalist softball player at the 1996 Summer Olympics and 2000 Summer Olympics

The McDermid Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non immenor beneficii
Motto Translation: Grateful for kindness.


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Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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