McCrystal History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The McCrystal name is an important part of the history of the ancient Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. McCrystal is derived from Christopher, an ancient and popular font name which has been common since the 12th century. [1] Another source claims the name was "derived from a geographical locality. 'of Cristall.' I cannot find the spot, but Yorkshire seems to have been the home of the surname." [2]

Early Origins of the McCrystal family

The surname McCrystal was first found in Yorkshire where one of the first records of the name was Robert de Cristall who was registered in the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379. [2]

Scotland was another homeland for the family and in this case, "it is certainly a diminutive or pet form of Christopher. The first form was an old surname in Foveran and it was not uncommon in Prestwick, Ayrshire, in the fifteenth century" [3]

Early History of the McCrystal family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McCrystal research. Another 96 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1470, 1474, 1491, 1567, 1650, 1672, 1790, 1535 and 1487 are included under the topic Early McCrystal History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McCrystal Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name McCrystal were recorded, including Chrystal, Cristall, Cristoll, Cristole, Cristell, Crystal, Crystall, MacCrystall, MacCristall and many more.

Early Notables of the McCrystal family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include Thomas Crystall, (d. 1535) the twenty second abbot of a Cistercian monastery of Kinloss, near Forres in Moray. "Crystall was born in Culross in Perthshire, and educated in its monastery, a house of the Cistercians, where his talents, especially for music, attracted the attention of James Rait, the abbot, and his brother William, a skilled musician...
Another 64 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McCrystal Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McCrystal family

To escape oppression and starvation at that time, many English families left for the "open frontiers" of the New World with all its perceived opportunities. In droves people migrated to the many British colonies, those in North America in particular, paying high rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Although many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, those who did see the shores of North America perceived great opportunities before them. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the McCrystal family emigrate to North America: James Chrystal who arrived in Philadelphia in 1868.


Contemporary Notables of the name McCrystal (post 1700) +

  • Eamonn McCrystal (b. 1987), Irish pop tenor and TV/radio host in America
  • Frank McCrystal, Canadian head coach of the Regina Rams
  • Damien McCrystal (b. 1961), British journalist, first City editor of The Sun in September 1981
  • Cal McCrystal (b. 1959), British theatre director, brother of Damien McCrystal


The McCrystal Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Mens conscia recti
Motto Translation: A mind conscious of rectitude.


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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