McClintok History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The sea-swept Hebrides islands and the west coast of Scotland, made up the ancient Dalriadan kingdom, the ancestral home of the McClintok family. Their name comes from the Gaelic name Mac Gille Ghionndaig, commonly MacGilliondaig, which means son of the servant of St. Finndag or son of the fair young man. [1] S. Findan was founder of the monastery of Clonard in Belfast Ireland. "Fintan, Fintoc (whence later Fionndoc), are diminutives of Finn, later Florin." [1]

Early Origins of the McClintok family

The surname McClintok was first found in Argyllshire (Gaelic erra Ghaidheal), the region of western Scotland corresponding roughly with the ancient Kingdom of Dál Riata, in the Strathclyde region of Scotland, now part of the Council Area of Argyll and Bute.

One of the first records of the family used an ancient spelling, M'Gillindak who is author of a poem in the Dean of Lismore's Book. "The Maclintocks belong to Luss and thereabouts and in the district of Lorn around Lochaweside from 1500. Duncan Mc gellentak, witness in Balquhidder, 1549. " [1]

"MacClinton is a variant of Maclintock, q v., from the form Fintan. William McClintoun was messenger in Kyle in 1569 (RMS.). Finlay Macklintoun appears in the parish of Torphichen in 1676 (Torphichen)." [1]

Early History of the McClintok family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McClintok research. Another 191 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1693, 1684, 1692, 1394, 1757, 1611, 1797 and are included under the topic Early McClintok History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McClintok Spelling Variations

Many spelling variations of McClintok have been recorded over the years, including These are the result of the medieval practice of spelling according to sound and repeated translation between Gaelic and English. MacClintock, MacLintock, MacLinden, MacAlinden and many more.

Early Notables of the McClintok family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early McClintok Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the McClintok family to Ireland

Some of the McClintok family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 91 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States McClintok migration to the United States +

Many who arrived from Scotland settled along the east coast of North America in communities that would go on to become the backbones of the young nations of the United States and Canada. In the American War of Independence, many settlers who remained loyal to England went north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. Their descendants later began to recover the lost Scottish heritage through events such as the highland games that dot North America in the summer months. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the McClintok family emigrate to North America:

McClintok Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James McClintok, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1845 [2]


The McClintok Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Virtute et labore
Motto Translation: By valour and exertion.


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


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