McAuley History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Many variations of the name McAuley have evolved since the time of its initial creation. In Gaelic it appeared as Mac Amhalghaidh or Mac Amhlaoibh. The former name denotes a son of Auley, while the later denotes a son of Auliffe or a son of Humphrey. They claim descent through the Heremon line of Irish kings. [1]

Early Origins of the McAuley family

The surname McAuley was first found in county Westmeath (Irish: An Iarmhí) in the Irish Midlands, province of Leinster, where at one time the area which is now Ballyloughnoe was once called "McGawley's Country." There is another sept named Mac Amhlaoibh in Gaelic which were a branch of the MacGuires and mainly found in County Fermanagh. This branch gave their name to Clanawley. [2]

Early History of the McAuley family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McAuley research. Another 109 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1787 and 1841 are included under the topic Early McAuley History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McAuley Spelling Variations

Before widespread literacy came to Ireland, a name was often recorded under several different variations during the life of its bearer. Accordingly, numerous spelling variations were revealed in the search for the origin of the name McAuley family name. Variations found include MacAulay, MacAwley, MacAuley, MacAullay, MacAulley, MacAwlay, MacCaulay, MacCawley, MacGawley, Magawley, Cauley, Caulay, McCamley and many more.

Early Notables of the McAuley family (pre 1700)

Another 34 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McAuley Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States McAuley migration to the United States +

During the 19th century thousands of impoverished Irish families made the long journey to British North America and the United States. These people were leaving a land that had become beset with poverty, lack of opportunity, and hunger. In North America, they hoped to find land, work, and political and religious freedoms. Although the majority of the immigrants that survived the long sea passage did make these discoveries, it was not without much perseverance and hard work: by the mid-19th century land suitable for agriculture was short supply, especially in British North America, in the east; the work available was generally low paying and physically taxing construction or factory work; and the English stereotypes concerning the Irish, although less frequent and vehement, were, nevertheless, present in the land of freedom, liberty, and equality for all men. The largest influx of Irish settlers occurred with Great Potato Famine during the late 1840s. Research into passenger and immigration lists has brought forth evidence of the early members of the McAuley family in North America:

McAuley Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Norman McAuley, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1774 [3]
  • Matthew McAuley, who arrived in New York in 1797 [3]
  • William McAuley, who arrived in New York in 1797 [3]
McAuley Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Samuel McAuley, aged 34, who landed in New York in 1812 [3]
  • George McAuley, who arrived in New York in 1823 [3]
  • Charles McAuley, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1838 [3]
  • Daniel McAuley, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1839 [3]
  • Peter McAuley, aged 21, who arrived in New York in 1854 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada McAuley migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McAuley Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Ms. Catherine McAuley who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Covenanter" departing 17th June 1847 from Cork, Ireland; the ship arrived on 9th August 1847 but she died on board [4]
  • Mr. James McAuley, aged 60 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Rose" departing 19th April 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 1st July 1847 but he died on board [4]
  • Mrs. Mary McAuley, aged 55 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Coromandel" departing 13th May 1847 from Dublin, Ireland; the ship arrived on 2nd July 1847 but she died on board [4]
  • Miss. Mary McAuley, aged 6 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Covenanter" departing 17th June 1847 from Cork, Ireland; the ship arrived on 9th August 1847 but she died on board [4]
  • Mr. Morris McAuley, aged 60 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Coromandel" departing 13th May 1847 from Dublin, Ireland; the ship arrived on 2nd July 1847 but he died on board [4]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia McAuley migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

McAuley Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Mcauley, (McCally), (b. 1803), aged 31, Scottish weaver who was convicted in Edinburgh, Scotland for life for assault, transported aboard the "Bengal Merchant" on 27th September 1834, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [5]
  • Martin McAuley, aged 17, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Rodney" [6]
  • Emily McAuley, aged 18, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Constantine"
  • Martin McAuley, aged 32, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship "Bee"

New Zealand McAuley migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

McAuley Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James McAuley, Australian settler travelling from Melbourne, Victoria aboard the ship "Dunedin" arriving in Dunedin, South Island, New Zealand on 12th March 1860 [7]
  • John McAuley, aged 49, a labourer, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Jessie Osborne" in 1867
  • Mary McAuley, aged 21, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Jessie Osborne" in 1867
  • John McAuley, aged 21, a farm labourer, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Jessie Osborne" in 1867
  • Eliza J. McAuley, aged 24, a farm labourer, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Jessie Osborne" in 1867
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name McAuley (post 1700) +

  • Jerry McAuley (1839-1884), Irish-born American, converted convict, river thief, and alcoholic who founded America's first gospel rescue mission
  • Ike McAuley (1891-1928), American professional baseball player
  • William McAuley, American politician, Member of New York State Assembly from Washington County, 1800-01 [8]
  • J. F. McAuley, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Iowa, 1912 [8]
  • Tony McAuley (b. 1939), Irish TV and radio director and producer
  • Roisin McAuley, Irish novelist
  • Robin McAuley, Irish musician
  • Jimmy McAuley (b. 1901), Northern Irish football player
  • Gareth McAuley (b. 1979), Northern Irish footballer
  • Dave McAuley (b. 1961), Northern Irish professional boxer
  • ... (Another 13 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. John Mcauley, British Able Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [9]


  1. ^ O'Hart, John, Irish Pedigrees 5th Edition in 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0737-4)
  2. ^ MacLysaght, Edward, Irish Families Their Names, Arms and Origins 4th Edition. Dublin: Irish Academic, 1982. Print. (ISBN 0-7165-2364-7)
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 86)
  5. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 7th October 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/bengal-merchant
  6. ^ South Australian Register Wednesday 21st February 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Rodney 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/rodney1855.shtml
  7. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  8. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 14) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  9. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate