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Mankins History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Welsh Mankins surname is thought to derived from name of the village of Machen, located near Caerphilly, in the county of Monmouthshire.


Early Origins of the Mankins family


The surname Mankins was first found in Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy), at Machen, a parish, in the union of Newport, partly in the hundred of Wentlloog, South Wales. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Mankins family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mankins research.
Another 65 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1541, 1614, 1614, 1600 and 1675 are included under the topic Early Mankins History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mankins Spelling Variations


Welsh surnames are relatively few in number, but they have an inordinately large number of spelling variations. There are many factors that explain the preponderance of Welsh variants, but the earliest is found during the Middle Ages when Welsh surnames came into use. Scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, which often resulted in a single person's name being inconsistently recorded over his lifetime. The transliteration of Welsh names into English also accounts for many of the spelling variations: the unique Brythonic Celtic language of the Welsh had many sounds the English language was incapable of accurately reproducing. It was also common for members of a same surname to change their names slightly, in order to signify a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations. For all of these reasons, the many spelling variations of particular Welsh names are very important. The surname Mankins has occasionally been spelled Machen, Machin, Machon, Mackon, Makin, Makins, MacMacken and many more.

Early Notables of the Mankins family (pre 1700)


Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was Thomas Machen (c. 1541-1614), an English mercer who was mayor of Gloucester three times, Member of Parliament for Gloucester in 1614; Bathsua Reginald Makin (c.1600-c.1675) English middle-class proto-feminist who...
Another 38 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mankins Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Mankins family to Ireland


Some of the Mankins family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 31 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Mankins family to the New World and Oceana


In the 1800s and 1900s, many Welsh families left for North America, in search of land, work, and freedom. Those who made the trip successfully helped contribute to the growth of industry, commerce, and the cultural heritage of both Canada and the United States. In the immigration and passenger lists were a number of people bearing the name Mankins Bernard, Charles, Hugh, James, John, Michael, Patrick, Steven and Thomas Mackin all arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania between 1840 and 1860; Hugh, Michael, Patrick, Thomas and William Macken also arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860.

Contemporary Notables of the name Mankins (post 1700)


  • James Earl "Jimmy" Mankins Sr. (1926-2013), American businessman and politician, Member of the Texas House of Representatives (1974-1982)
  • Jim Mankins (b. 1944), American former running back in the National Football League and Canadian Football League
  • Daniel Mankins, American politician, Mayor of Grafton, West Virginia, 1996-97 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 8) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

Mankins Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 8) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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