Maggenis History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

While many of Irish names are quite familiar to most, their original Gaelic forms are often forgotten and mysterious. The original Gaelic form of the name Maggenis is Mag Aonghusa or Mag Aonghuis, which mean "son of Angus." [1]

Early Origins of the Maggenis family

The surname Maggenis was first found in County Down (Irish:An Dún) part of the Province of Ulster, in Northern Ireland, formerly known as county St Mirren, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the Maggenis family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Maggenis research. Another 140 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1539, 1543, 1584, 1640, 1703, 1797, 1798, 1868 and 1759 are included under the topic Early Maggenis History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Maggenis Spelling Variations

The recording of names in Ireland in the Middle Ages was an inconsistent endeavor at best due to competing dialects and languages, and the general illiteracy of the population. Research into the name Maggenis revealed many spelling variations, including Genis, Guinness, Magennis, Guinnessy, McGuinness and many more.

Early Notables of the Maggenis family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family at this time was Hugo Magennis (d. 1640) who was the Franciscan Bishop of Down and Connor; the second Viscount Iveagh, Brian Magennis who was killed in action in 1703; Richard and Richard the...
Another 38 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Maggenis Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Maggenis migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Maggenis Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Ellen Maggenis, aged 29, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Ballochmyle" in 1874


  1. ^ MacLysaght, Edward, Irish Families Their Names, Arms and Origins 4th Edition. Dublin: Irish Academic, 1982. Print. (ISBN 0-7165-2364-7)


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