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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2016


The ancestors of the name MacIntire are thought to have come from the ancient Scottish kingdom of Dalriada. MacIntire was used to indicate someone who worked as a carpenter or wright. The Gaelic form Mac an t-saoir means son of the carpenter. Most historians agree that their earliest habitations were on MacDonald territories on Kintyre. Most legends about their beginnings point to an origin in the Hebrides. From this point on, opinions differ. One legend has the Clan-an-t-Saor (Children of the Carpenter) arriving in Lorne in a galley with a white cow, another says that the galley, set adrift, developed a leak below the water line and the MacDonald Chieftain placed his thumb in the hole to keep the boat afloat. Spotting help at a distance, he cut off his thumb so that he could wave. He was ironically named the Carpenter or MacIntyre. Some claim that the family derived its name from a member of the MacDonalds who was called Cean-tire because of his ownership of lands on the peninsula of Kintyre.

MacIntire Early Origins



The surname MacIntire was first found in Argyllshire (Gaelic erra Ghaidheal), the region of western Scotland corresponding roughly with the ancient Kingdom of Dál Riata, in the Strathclyde region of Scotland, now part of the Council Area of Argyll and Bute, where according legend, Maurice or Murdock, The Wright, (c.1150) became the first MacIntyre chief as a reward for helping his uncle, Somerled, King of Argyll and the Western Isles.

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MacIntire Spelling Variations


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MacIntire Spelling Variations



In the Middle Ages, the translation between Gaelic and English was not a highly developed process. Spelling was not yet standardized, and so, an enormous number of spelling variations appear in records of early Scottish names. MacIntire has appeared as MacIntyre, MacIntire, MacIntre and many more.

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MacIntire Early History


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MacIntire Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our MacIntire research. Another 361 words (26 lines of text) covering the years 1955 and 1991 are included under the topic Early MacIntire History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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MacIntire Early Notables (pre 1700)


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MacIntire Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 25 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early MacIntire Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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MacIntire In Ireland


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MacIntire In Ireland



Some of the MacIntire family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 105 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Many of the ancestors of Dalriadan families who arrived in North America still live in communities along the east coast of Canada and the United States. In the American War of Independence many of the original settlers traveled north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries the ancestors of many Scots began recovering their collective national heritage through Clan societies, highland games, and other patriotic events. Research into the origins of individual families in North America revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name MacIntire or a variant listed above:

MacIntire Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Finloe MacIntire, who arrived in Maryland in 1716
  • Hugh Macintire, who landed in Maryland in 1716
  • John Macintire, who landed in Maryland in 1716
  • John MacIntire, who arrived in Maryland in 1716
  • Archi Macintire, who landed in Maryland in 1747
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

MacIntire Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Samuel Macintire, who landed in New York, NY in 1815
  • Robert Macintire, who landed in New York, NY in 1815
  • James MacIntire, who landed in New York, NY in 1815
  • James Macintire, who arrived in New York, NY in 1815
  • Robert MacIntire, who landed in New York, NY in 1816

MacIntire Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Susannah Campbell MacIntire, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1840

MacIntire Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • John Macintire, English convict from Middlesex, who was transported aboard the "Albion" on September 21, 1826, settling in New South Wales, Australia [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Albion voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1826 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1826

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Contemporary Notables of the name MacIntire (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name MacIntire (post 1700)



  • Walter S. MacIntire, American politician, Prohibition Candidate for U.S. Representative from Connecticut, 1905, 1906

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Per ardua
Motto Translation: Through difficulties.


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MacIntire Family Crest Products


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MacIntire Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Albion voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1826 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1826

Other References

  1. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  2. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Scarlett, James D. Tartan The Highland Textile. London: Shepheard-Walwyn, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0-85683-120-4).
  4. Martine, Roddy, Roderick Martine and Don Pottinger. Scottish Clan and Family Names Their Arms, Origins and Tartans. Edinburgh: Mainstream, 1992. Print.
  5. Paul, Sir James Balfour. An Ordinary of Arms Contained in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland Second Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1903. Print.
  6. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  7. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  8. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Bolton's American Armory. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1964. Print.
  9. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  10. Donaldson, Gordon and Robert S. Morpeth. Who's Who In Scotish History. Wales: Welsh Academic Press, 1996. Print. (ISBN 186057-0054).
  11. ...

The MacIntire Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The MacIntire Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 6 September 2016 at 02:39.

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