MacCarvil History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name MacCarvil arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The MacCarvil family lived in Norfolk. The name is taken from the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, in Carville, Normandy. [1]

Early Origins of the MacCarvil family

The surname MacCarvil was first found in Norfolk.

"The gateway of the ancient Hall [of Wiggenhall] built by the Kerville family, is still remaining. The church is a stately structure in the later English style, with a square erabattled tower; the nave is lighted by clerestory windows, and there are a fine brass eagle, and an altar-tomb bearing the arms of the Kervilles and the Plowdens, with the effigies of a knight in armour, his lady, and two children." [2]

The source 'History of Norfolk' includes the following entries for the family with various spellings throughout: Robert de Cherevill, Norfolk, 29 Henry II; Roger de Cherevile, Norfolk, 10 Richard I; Walter Cnervyle, rector of Bicham Well, Norfolk, 1329; Frederic de Carvill, Norfolk; Humphrey Carvile, Norfolk, 30 Henry VIII; Thomas Carvel, Norfolk, 1662; and Edmund Carvill, Norfolk, 1599. [3]

Important Dates for the MacCarvil family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our MacCarvil research. Another 109 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1204, 1603, 1566, 1545, 1549, 1553, 1566, 1600, 1664, 1600, 1622, 1647, 1655, 1664 and are included under the topic Early MacCarvil History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

MacCarvil Spelling Variations

A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Carvill, Carvel, Carvell, Carvil, Carvile, Carville, Kervel, Carvaile, Carwell and many more.

Early Notables of the MacCarvil family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Nicholas Carvell (d. 1566), English poet, elected from Eton to King's College 1545, was B.A. 1549, M.A. 1553. "He was at Zurich during the reign of Queen Mary, but returned after Elizabeth's accession and died in the summer of 1566. " [4] Thomas Carwell (1600-1664), Jesuit, whose real name was Thorold, "belonged to the ancient Lincolnshire family...
Another 63 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early MacCarvil Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the MacCarvil family to Ireland

Some of the MacCarvil family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 76 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the MacCarvil family

Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name MacCarvil or a variant listed above: Edward Carvel who settled in Philadelphia in 1852; William Carvill settled in Philadelphia in 1844; Patrick Carville settled in Philadelphia in 1868; James Carwell and his wife Margaret settled in Georgia in 1732..

Citations

  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Rye, Walter, A History of Norfolk. London: Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, 1885. Print
  4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
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