Lattimer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Within the rugged landscape of Moors and hills called Wales the ancient name Lattimer was developed. At one time this surname was the profession for someone who was "a speaker of Latin, that being the vehicle of all record or transcript. Latin for centuries was the common ground on which all European ecclesiastics met. Thus it became looked upon as the language of interpretation." [1]

"This surname is said to have been adopted from the tenure of certain lands, which required the possessor thereof to act as "latimer," or interpreter. In English history it occupies a prominent place, and has been borne at various times by the most distinguished warriors." [2]

Early Origins of the Lattimer family

The surname Lattimer was first found in Breconshire (Welsh: Sir Frycheiniog), a traditional county in southern Wales, which takes its name from the Welsh kingdom of Brycheiniog (5th-10th centuries.)

Four barons are mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086: "David interpres, who held Dorset; Hugo latinarius who held Hants and Somerset; Ralph Latimarus, who held Essex; and Lewis Latinarius, who held Herefordshire. Ralph was Secretary to the Conqueror and from him derived William de Latimer, who in 1165 held a knight's fee of Vesci in Yorkshire." [1]

"In the reign of Henry III. flourished William de Latimer, a crusader under Prince Edward, and a gallant soldier in the French wars; and under Edward III., William, Lord Latimer, his great grandson, a warrior of great renown, celebrated for a victory achieved over Charles of Blois, at the siege of Doveroy, where, with only 1600 men, English and Bretons, he encountered that Prince, who had come to the relief of the place at the head of 3,600 men; and defeated and slew him, besides nearly a thousand knights and esquires; taking prisoners also, two earls, twenty-seven lords, and fifteen hundred men-at-arms." [2]

Latimer, a village and civil parish in Buckinghamshire is often mistakenly understood to be the family's origin, but this village dates back to 1220 when it was listed as Yselhamstede and Isenhamstede, and by 1389, it was listed as Laytmer. However, the Laytmer family resided there by the 14th century. [3]

Glaisdale in the North Riding of Yorkshire "was the property of Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, and, with the rest of the parish of Danby, descended to the Thwengs, and afterwards to the Latimers, lords of Danby; it is now divided into many freeholds." [4] William Latimer was gifted Iselhempstead Latimer in Buckinghamshire from the estate of Simon Beresford.

Early History of the Lattimer family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Lattimer research. Another 108 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1380, 1487, 1555, 1467, 1545 and are included under the topic Early Lattimer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lattimer Spelling Variations

There are relatively few surnames native to Wales, but they have an inordinately large number of spelling variations. Early variations of Welsh surnames can be explained by the fact that very few people in the early Middle Ages were literate. Priests and the few other literate people were responsible for recording names in official documents. And because most people could not specific how to properly record their names it was up to the individual recorder of that time to determine how a spoken name should be recorded. Variations due to the imprecise or improper recording of a name continued later in history when names originally composed in the Brythonic Celtic, language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, were transliterated into English. Welsh names that were documented in English often changed dramatically since the native language of Wales, which was highly inflected, did not copy well. Occasionally, however, spelling variations were carried out according to an individual's specific design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations could be indicated by minor variations. The spelling variations of the name Lattimer have included Latimer, Latimor, Lattimer, Lattimor, Lattimore and many more.

Early Notables of the Lattimer family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was Hugh Latimer (c.1487-1555) English Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge and Bishop of Worcester before the Reformation, later Church of England...
Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Lattimer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lattimer Ranking

In the United States, the name Lattimer is the 12,585th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [5]

Ireland Migration of the Lattimer family to Ireland

Some of the Lattimer family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 50 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Lattimer migration to the United States +

Many Welsh families joined their Scottish and Irish neighbors during the late 1800s and early 1900s in seeking refuge in North America. Like the Irish and Scottish, many Welsh anxiously awaited the work, freedom, and opportunities that they believed lay in North America. Those who did journey over to the United States and what became known as Canada often realized those dreams, but only through much toil and perseverance. Whenever and however these Welsh immigrants arrived in North America, they were instrumental in the creation of the industry, commerce, and cultural heritage within those two developing nations. In the immigration and passenger lists a number of early immigrants bearing the name Lattimer were found:

Lattimer Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Frederick C Lattimer, who landed in Colorado in 1906 [6]

Australia Lattimer migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Lattimer Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Miss Mary Lattimer, English convict who was convicted in Cumbria (Cumberland), England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Canada" in March 1810, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [7]
  • Mr. George Lattimer who was convicted in Dumfries, Scotland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Camden" on 21st March 1831, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [8]

New Zealand Lattimer migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Lattimer Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • William Lattimer, aged 35, a ploughman, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Queen of Nations" in 1874
  • Fanny Lattimer, aged 36, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Queen of Nations" in 1874
  • James Lattimer, aged 6, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Queen of Nations" in 1874
  • Ann J. Lattimer, aged 4, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Queen of Nations" in 1874
  • Sarah Lattimer, aged 2, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Queen of Nations" in 1874
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Lattimer (post 1700) +

  • John Kingsley Lattimer MD (1914-2007), American urologist who did extensive research on the Lincoln and Kennedy assassinations
  • Robert Lattimer, American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1996, 2000 (alternate) [9]
  • C. B. Lattimer, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1932 [9]


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  2. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 9th December 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/canada
  8. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 2nd December 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/camden
  9. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 7) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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