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lamphier History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms


Origins Available: French , Scottish


The name lamphier is from the Languedoc region of southern France, it came from the ancient Greek personal name, Petros and the Biblical name, Peter, meaning "rock".


Early Origins of the lamphier family


The surname lamphier was first found in Languedoc where this impressive family held a family seat since ancient times.

The family expanded, prospered and established the branches of the Lords of Saint Marcel, of Nîmes and of Bernis-Calvière. Bertrand III De Pierre was married four times, first in 1540 to Jeanne De Chalancon-Polignac, second to Christine De Geys in 1548, third to Guisette Duranc De Vibrac in 1550, and finally to Louis D'Artfeld in 1557. An important member of the military, Jean II, Lord of Bernis, was the mestre de camp (Commander of a cavalry regiment) under Henri IV during the 1500's. His son, Jean-Jacques, Lord of Bernis, commanded the Phalsbourg regiment, but he was killed at the Fontanette battle in Milanais in the 1600's. Descending from Jean, Joachim De Pierre, Lord of St-Marcel and of Bernis, was a Captain of the Cavalry and, in 1697, he married Marie-Elisabeth Du Chastel, daughter of Christophe, Baron of Condres, and of Louise Du Chastel, Baroness of Châteauneuf.

A decorated member of the military, François De Pierre, Lord of Loubatière, was a Captain of the Montconseil regiment who received the Grand-Cross of Saint-Jean of Jerusalem in the 1700's. One of the most remarkable members of the family, Pons-Simon, Viscount of Bernis, then Marquis of Pierre-Bernis, started off as a King's Page, then he became the Captain of the King's Dragoons. He continued to receive promotions: in 1771, Commander of the Dragoons; in 1776, Colonel of the Soissonais regiment; in 1784, Brigadier of the King's armies; in 1788, Camp Marshal of the King's armies, and then Baron of the Estates of Languedoc and of Albigeois. Many other members of the family received important honours for their military and civil services, but they are too numerous to list.


Early History of the lamphier family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our lamphier research.
Another 216 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1000, 1116, 1217, 1286, 1380, 1462 and 1200 are included under the topic Early lamphier History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

lamphier Spelling Variations


French surnames were subject to numerous spelling alterations depending on the region and time it was used. The early development of the French language relied heavily on borrowing elements and grammar from other languages. For example, Old French was infused with Germanic words and sounds when barbarian tribes invaded and settled in France after the fall of the Roman Empire. Middle French also borrowed heavily from the Italian language during the Renaissance. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name lamphier is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Pierre, Pierres, De Pierre, De Pierres, Pyerre, Pyerres, De Pyerre, De Pyerres, Lapierre, Lapierres, La Pierre, La Pierres, La Pyerre, La Pyerres, Lanphere, Lanpher, Lanphier and many more.

Early Notables of the lamphier family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early lamphier Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the lamphier family to the New World and Oceana


In 1643, 109 years after the first landings by Cartier, there were only about 300 people in Quebec. Migration was slow. The fur trade attracted migrants, both noble and commoner. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the French Acadian presence in the Maritimes had reached 500. The French founded Lower Canada, thus becoming one of the two great founding nations of Canada. The family name lamphier has made many distinguished contributions in France and New France to the world of science, culture, religion, and education. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name lamphier were

lamphier Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • William B. Lamphier, who arrived in Providence, Rhode Island in 1837

The lamphier Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Armé pour le roi
Motto Translation: Armed for the king


lamphier Family Crest Products



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