Jardim History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Jardim was first used in the Scottish/English Borderlands by an ancient Scottish people called the Strathclyde- Britons. It was a name for someone who lived in Angus. Jardim is thought to have been a Norman name that made it's way North into Scotland. It is ultimately derived from the Old French word jardin, or "garden." Further research indicates that the family settled very early in the barony of Gardyne in the parish of Kirkden, Angus. It is from these lands that the family takes its name; although a more literal interpretation of the name would mean 'of the garden.' The family also held estates in Arbroath, Aberdeen, Banff and Perth for centuries. [1]

Early Origins of the Jardim family

The surname Jardim was first found in Angus (Gaelic: Aonghas), part of the Tayside region of northeastern Scotland, and present day Council Area of Angus, formerly known as Forfar or Forfarshire, where one of the first official records was Winefredus de Jardine in 1153 when he witnessed charters by King David 1st to the Abbeys of Kelso and Arbroath.

Early feudal rolls provided the king of the time a method of cataloguing holdings for taxation, but today they provide a glimpse into the wide surname spellings in use at that time.

"Umfrid de Jardin witnessed a charter by Robert de Bruys to the Abbey of Arnbroath, c. 1178-80, and as Humphrey del Gardin witnessed confirmation of a fishery in Torduf c. 1194-1211. Patrick de Gardinus was cleric to the bishop of Glasgow c. 1200, and Sir Humphrey de Gardino witnessed a resignation of lands in Annandale a. 1245." [1]

Early History of the Jardim family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jardim research. Another 338 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1014, 1476, 1684, 1712, 1777, 1800, 1597, 1672, 1885, 1916, 1906, 1919, 1919, 1910, 1918, 1695, 1699, 1683 and 1737 are included under the topic Early Jardim History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jardim Spelling Variations

The many spelling variations in Medieval Scottish names result from the fact that scribes in that era spelled words according to sound. Translation too, was an undeveloped science, and many names were altered into complete obscurity. Over the years Jardim has been spelled Jardine, Jardin, Gardin, Gardyn, Garden and others.

Early Notables of the Jardim family (pre 1700)

Another 29 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jardim Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Jardim family to Ireland

Some of the Jardim family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jardim family

To escape the uncertainties and discrimination faced in Scotland, many decided to head out for North America. Once they arrived, many Scots fought with relish in the American War of Independence; some went north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. Many ancestors of these Scots have recovered their lost national heritage in the 20th century through Clan organizations and Scottish historical societies. Among the settlers to North America were: Andrew and Bessie Jardin landed in America in 1685; Christopher Jardine settled in New Orleans in 1822; George, Joseph, and Lewis Jardine settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania between 1798 and 1846.


Contemporary Notables of the name Jardim (post 1700) +

  • Emanuel Jardim Fernandes (b. 1944), Portuguese politician

RMS Titanic
  • Mr. José Neto Jardim (d. 1912), aged 21, Portuguese Third Class passenger from Calheta, Madeira who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [2]


The Jardim Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cave adsum
Motto Translation: Beware I am here.


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Titanic Passenger List - Titanic Facts. (Retrieved 2016, July 13) . Retrieved from http://www.titanicfacts.net/titanic-passenger-list.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate