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Hudsind History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The generations and branches of the Hudsind family share a name that has its roots in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. The name Hudsind comes from the name Hudd, a pet form of both Hugh and Richard. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
[2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
The surname Hudsind features the patronymic suffix -son, which was most common in the north of England and superseded other patronymic suffixes in popularity during the 14th century.

Early Origins of the Hudsind family


The surname Hudsind was first found in Yorkshire where one of the first records of the name was John Hudsone, Hutson who was listed in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield in 1323. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 list: Johannes Hudson; Johannes Hudeson; and Adam Huddeson. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
There are numerous entries for the name further north in Scotland. One of the first on record there was James Hudson, a charter witness in Kelso in 1466. John Hudsone and Willie Hutson were tenants on land of the Abbey of Kelso in 1567. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
The castle of Woodcroft in Etton, Northampton was the scene of a rather gruesome event of one of the family. "Castle Woodcroft, is said to have been the scene of the murder of Dr. Hudson, chaplain of Charles I., who was forced over the battlements by the parliamentarian forces stationed here, who, hacking with their swords the hands by which he endeavoured to cling to the walls, caused him to fall into the moat beneath, where he was instantly put to death. The castle has been restored by Earl Fitzwilliam; the tower from which Dr. Hudson was thrown, and the moat in which he was killed, are still entire." [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Hudsind family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hudsind research.
Another 449 words (32 lines of text) covering the years 1766, 1766, 1567, 1660, 1637, 1612, 1560, 1611, 1619, 1682, 1662, 1719, 1615 and 1672 are included under the topic Early Hudsind History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hudsind Spelling Variations


Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Hudsind include Hudson, Hutson and others.

Early Notables of the Hudsind family (pre 1700)


Notables of the family at this time include Henry Hudson (1560-1611), English navigator explorer for whom the Hudson's Bay, Canada is named; Jeffrey Hudson (1619-c.1682), an English court dwarf at the court of Queen Henrietta Maria, nicknamed the "Queen's...
Another 39 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hudsind Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hudsind family to the New World and Oceana


Searching for a better life, many English families migrated to British colonies. Unfortunately, the majority of them traveled under extremely harsh conditions: overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the ocean. For those families that arrived safely, modest prosperity was attainable, and many went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the new colonies. Research into the origins of individual families in North America revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Hudsind or a variant listed above: Robert Hudson, who arrived in Virginia in 1623; William Hudson, who settled in Virginia in 1635; Ralph Hudson, who settled in Massachusetts with his wife Marie and three children in 1635.

Hudsind Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  5. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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