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Huckle History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



It was among those Anglo-Saxon tribes that once ruled over Britain that the name Huckle was formed. The name was derived from the Old English name Ucca, which is a pet form of the Old English personal name Uhtræd. The surname Huckle features the common diminutive suffix -el. The surname Huckle is sometimes derived from the village of Hochenale in Nottinghamshire.

Early Origins of the Huckle family


The surname Huckle was first found in Nottinghamshire, where they held a family seat before the Norman Conquest.

Early History of the Huckle family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Huckle research.
Another 265 words (19 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Huckle History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Huckle Spelling Variations


Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Huckle include Hucknall, Hucknell, Hucknal, Hucknel, Huckle, Huckell and many more.

Early Notables of the Huckle family (pre 1700)


Another 20 words (1 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Huckle Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Huckle family to the New World and Oceana


Thousands of English families boarded ships sailing to the New World in the hope of escaping the unrest found in England at this time. Although the search for opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad took the lives of many because of the cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels, the opportunity perceived in the growing colonies of North America beckoned. Many of the settlers who survived the journey went on to make important contributions to the transplanted cultures of their adopted countries. The Huckle were among these contributors, for they have been located in early North American records:

Huckle Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • William Huckle, who sailed to Barbados in 1635
  • William Huckle, aged 20, who landed in Barbados in 1635 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • Andrew Huckle to Virginia in 1643
  • Andrew Huckle, who landed in Virginia in 1643 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • John Huckle, who arrived in Virginia in 1657 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Huckle Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • John Huckle to America in 1764

Huckle Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Eliza Huckle, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Ramillies" in 1849 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) RAMILIES 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Ramillies.htm
  • Jane Huckle, aged 18, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship "Fatima" [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The barque FATIMA 1850, 521 tons. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1850Fatima.htm

Contemporary Notables of the name Huckle (post 1700)


  • Wilbur Allan Huckle (b. 1937), American former baseball prospect for the New York Mets in 1964, who despite never making the team was a "fan favorite," some even wore "Wilbur Huckle for President" pins
  • James Huckle (b. 1990), English two-time silver and bronze medalist sport shooter who competed at the 2008 Commonwealth Games and the 2012 Summer Olympics
  • Patrick Huckle (b. 1983), German footballer
  • Theodore Huckle QC, Welsh barrister and the Counsel General of the Welsh Government
  • John Sydney Rodney Huckle, British general assistant at Stonington Island in 1949, eponym of Mount Huckle, Antarctica
  • Sir Henry G Huckle, World War II RAF bomber pilot and corporate executive
  • Alan Edden Huckle (b. 1948), British colonial administrator, Commissioner of the British Indian Ocean Territory and the British Antarctic (2001-2004), Governor of the Falkland Islands (2006-)
  • Adam George Huckle (b. 1971), former Zimbabwean cricketer

Huckle Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) RAMILIES 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Ramillies.htm
  3. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The barque FATIMA 1850, 521 tons. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1850Fatima.htm

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