Huband History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

When the ancestors of the Huband family arrived in England following the Norman Conquest of 1066, they brought their name with them. It is a name for a farmer. The name was originally derived from the Old English husband, which meant one who tills soil. The modern connotations of the word appeared much later. "A husband was the farmer of a husbandland of 26 acres." [1]

Early Origins of the Huband family

The surname Huband was first found in Yorkshire where Ernald, Robert Husebond was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1176 and later in Northumberland in 1231. Robert le Hosebonde was registered in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273. [2]

Walter le Husebond, Cambridgeshire was similarly registered in the Hundredorum Rolls. In Somerset, John Husebonde and William Husebond were both registered there 1 Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign.) [3]

Further to the north in Scotland, "Alexander Husband was prepositus of Invemairn in 1291, and in 1295 he was one of those who attested to the valuation of Kylrauoc and Estirgedeys. Andrew Husband was a weaver in Perth in 1506." [4]

Early History of the Huband family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Huband research. Another 198 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1206, 1728, 1742, 1679, 1689, 1695 and 1562 are included under the topic Early Huband History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Huband Spelling Variations

Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English linguistic stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often referred to by different spellings in different documents. The name has been spelled Husband, Husbands, Husbants, Husborne and others.

Early Notables of the Huband family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Huband Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Huband migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Huband Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. George Huband, (b. 1820), aged 43, British farm labourer travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Lancashire Witch" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 13th October 1863 [5]
  • Mrs. Mary Huband, (b. 1821), aged 42, British settler travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Lancashire Witch" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 13th October 1863 [5]
  • Mr. Henry Huband, (b. 1839), aged 24, British farm labourer travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Lancashire Witch" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 13th October 1863 [5]
  • Miss Eliza Huband, (b. 1845), aged 18, British domestic servant travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Lancashire Witch" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 13th October 1863 [5]


  1. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York: Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  5. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook