Home

Digital Products

Prints

Apparel

Home & Barware

Gifts


Customer Service



Houldsind History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Anglo-Saxon name Houldsind comes from the family having resided in the county of Lancashire, where they held the estate of Holden in the parish of Haslingden.


Early Origins of the Houldsind family


The surname Houldsind was first found in Lancashire where "Holden was an estate in the parish of Haslingden. A family of that name early sprang from the place." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
.

" Lancashire is the great home of the Holdens. The ancient gentle family of the Holdens, of Holden, Haslingden, dates back to the 13th century; from it there branched off in the 16th century the Holdens of Todd Hall in the same parish. The Holdens of Ewood, Livesey, date back to the reign of Henry VIII. The Holdens of Aston, Derbyshire, who go back to the beginning of the 17th century, may hail from the Lancashire stock." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.

Other early records include: Robert de Holden, Lancashire, listed there during the reign of Henry III; and Magota de Holdene who was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls. The Wills at Chester list the following: Oliver Holden, of Haslingden, Lincolnshire in 1588; Adam Holden, of Spotland, Lancashire in 1596; and Catherine Holden, of Holden in 1685. The Preston Guild Rolls of 1642 list Ralph Holden de Holden. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


Early History of the Houldsind family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Houldsind research.
Another 104 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1285, 1596, 1662, 1765, 1844 and are included under the topic Early Houldsind History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Houldsind Spelling Variations


Houldsind has been spelled many different ways. Before English spelling became standardized over the last few hundred years, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. As the English language changed in the Middle Ages, absorbing pieces of Latin and French, as well as other languages, the spelling of people's names also changed considerably, even over a single lifetime. Spelling variants included: Holden, Holdin, Holding, Houlden, Houldin, Howlin and many more.

Early Notables of the Houldsind family (pre 1700)


Another 28 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Houldsind Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Houldsind family to Ireland


Some of the Houldsind family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 75 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Houldsind family to the New World and Oceana


In an attempt to escape the chaos experienced in England, many English families boarded overcrowded and diseased ships sailing for the shores of North America and other British colonies. Those families hardy enough, and lucky enough, to make the passage intact were rewarded with land and a social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families became important contributors to the young colonies in which they settled. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first Houldsinds to arrive on North American shores: Randall Holden, who came to Rhode Island in 1630; Justinian Holden, who settled in New England in 1634; John Holden, who arrived in Virginia in 1637; Joane Holden, who came to Virginia in 1652.

The Houldsind Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nec temere nec timide
Motto Translation: Neither rashly nor timidly.


Houldsind Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.


Sign Up