Horn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Horn comes from one of the family having worked as a person who carved objects out of horn or made musical instruments. This name was also given to a person who was employed as a hornblower; in the Middle Ages, workmen were often summoned to work by the blowing of a horn. The surname Horn may also be a patronym derived from the personal name Horn. It may also be a local name given to someone who lived in one of the settlements of Horne in Rutland, Somerset, or Surrey, or near a bend, spur, or tongue of land.

Another source notes that the name is "a well-known Old English personal name, probably of Norse origin. Aluuin Horne was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086." [1]

Early Origins of the Horn family

The surname Horn was first found in Middlesex and Hertfordshire where "Alwin Horne held lands before the making of the Domesday." [2] "The name of Horn or Horne, at present well represented around Wisbech, is also found in Kent. It was also represented in these two counties in the 13th century, as well as in London, Suffolk, Sussex, Oxfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Northamptonshire, and Wiltshire." [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Adam Honi in Wiltshire, Henry Horn in Northamptonshire, Walter Horn in Oxfordshire, and Roger de Horne in Kent. [4] Over in Somerset, Kirby's Quest listed: William atte Horn and Thomas atte Home, temp 1 Edward III (in the first year of Edward III's reign. [5]

Andrew Horne (d. 1328), Chamberlain of London and legal writer, "born in London, carried on the trade of a fishmonger in Bridge Street. In 1315 he, with fifteen other fishmongers, was summoned before the sheriffs of London on a charge of using dorsers or baskets 'not of rightful measure.' Horn and one other person were acquitted. He was elected chamberlain of the city in January 1319." [6]

Further to the north in Scotland, "John Horn was beaten and evil-treated on the Border, 1279." [1] The "border" referenced was indeed the infamous border between England and Scotland, and events such as this may have precipitated King Edward I's intrusion into Scotland that took place in 1296.

Early History of the Horn family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Horn research. Another 122 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1086, 1279, 1400, 1434, 1404, 1406, 1407, 1487, 1540, 1510, 1579, 1560, 1580, 1568, 1565, 1640, 1581, 1584 and 1587 are included under the topic Early Horn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Horn Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Horn have been found, including: Horn, Horne, Athorne, Athorn and others.

Early Notables of the Horn family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include Henry Horne ( fl. 1400-1434), an English politician, Member of Parliament for Kent in 1404 and Sheriff of Kent (1406-1407); Sir William Whorne, Lord Mayor of London in 1487; Brother William Horne (d. 1540), one of the "Carthusian Martyrs." Robert Horne (c. 1510-1579), was an English churchman, and a leading reforming Protestant, one of the Marian exiles, he was subsequently Bishop...
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Horn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Horn migration to the United States +

Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become for new powerful nations. Among the first immigrants of the name Horn, or a variant listed above to cross the Atlantic and come to North America were :

Horn Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Christian Barentsen Van Horn, who settled in New York City in 1653
  • Jan Cornelissen Van Horn, who arrived in New Netherlands some time between 1620 and 1664
  • Edward and Winifred Horn, who settled in Maryland in 1664
  • Edward Horn, who arrived in Maryland in 1664 [7]
Horn Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Kasper Horn, who arrived in New York in 1709 [7]
  • Andreas Horn, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1732 [7]
  • Ulrich Horn, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1737 [7]
  • Joanis Horn, aged 24, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1741 [7]
  • Margretha Horn, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1743 [7]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Horn Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Joh Horn, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1802 [7]
  • Thomas Horn, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1838 [7]
  • Gustave Horn, aged 28, who landed in Missouri in 1840 [7]
  • Johann Gottlieb Horn, aged 55, who landed in America in 1843 [7]
  • Frederick C Horn, who landed in St Clair County, Illinois in 1845 [7]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Horn Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Albert Ernest Horn, who landed in Arkansas in 1906 [7]

Canada Horn migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Horn Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Jacob Horn, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1751
Horn Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Horn, aged 1 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Free Trader" departing 22nd June 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 14th August 1847 but he died on board [8]
  • Mr. Michael Horn who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Free Trader" departing 22nd June 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 14th August 1847 but he died on board [8]
  • Mr. Michael Horn, aged 5 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Free Trader" departing 22nd June 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 14th August 1847 but he died on board [8]

Australia Horn migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Horn Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Miss Harriett Ann Horn, (Holmes, Horne), (b. 1783), aged 29, English servant who was convicted in Essex, England for life for burglary, transported aboard the "Emu" in October 1812, the ship was captured and the passengers put ashore, the convicts were then transported aboard the "Broxburnebury" in January 1812 arriving in New South Wales, Australia [9]
  • Thomas Horn, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Orleana" in 1840 [10]
  • Richard Horn, aged 22, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Omega" [11]

New Zealand Horn migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Horn Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • John Horn, aged 37, a bricklayer, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • Harriet Horn, aged 32, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • William John Horn, aged 10, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • James P. Horn, aged 24, a carpenter, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Prince of Wales" in 1842
  • Sarah N. Horn, aged 19, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Prince of Wales" in 1842
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Horn (post 1700) +

  • Roy Horn (1944-2020), born Uwe Ludwig Horn; German-born, American magician, one half of Siegfried & Roy; he died from COVID-19
  • Henry S. Horn (1941-2019), American natural historian and ecologist, emeritus professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at Princeton University
  • Gilbert Horn Sr. (1924-2016), American Assiniboine soldier and code talker, member of Merrill's Marauders
  • Russell Van Horn, American bronze medalist for boxing at the 1904 Olympic games
  • Keith Adam Van Horn (b. 1975), American professional (NBA) basketball player
  • Welby Van Horn (b. 1920), American professional tennis player and coach
  • Robert Thompson Van Horn (1824-1916), American lawyer, newspaper publisher, Civil War officer, and politician, who was a mayor of Kansas City, Missouri
  • James Ronald Horn (b. 1940), American saxophonist and woodwind player [12]
  • Alfred Horn (1918-2001), American mathematician, eponym of the term "Horn clause"
  • Burt Van Horn (1823-1896), American politician, U.S. Congressman from New York
  • ... (Another 34 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Bismarck
  • Herbert Horn (1902-1941), German Maschinenmaat who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France; he died in the sinking [13]
  • Alfred Horn (1921-1941), German Matrosengefreiter who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France; he died in the sinking [13]
  • Heinz Horn (1913-1941), German Obermaschinist who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France; he died in the sinking [13]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. James Randolf Van Horn, American Seaman Second Class from Arizona, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Melvin Freeland Horn, American Fireman Third Class from Ohio, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [14]


The Horn Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nil desperandum
Motto Translation: Never despairing.


Suggested Readings for the name Horn +

  • 532 "Family History of Horn Ancestors & Descendants of Elisha Thomas Horn of Zion Hill, Mississippi" by Horn History Book Committee.

  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  6. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 80)
  9. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 3rd November 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/Emu
  10. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) ORLEANA 1840. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840Orleana.htm
  11. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) OMEGA 1851. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1851Omega.htm
  12. ^ James Horn. (Retrieved 2010, September 27) James Horn. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Horn
  13. ^ Bismarck & Tirpitz Class - Crew List Bismarck. (Retrieved 2018, February 06). Retrieved from https://www.bismarck-class.dk/bismarck/crew/bismarck_crew.html#crew_details
  14. ^ Pearl Harbour: USS Arizona Casualties List Pearl Harbour December 7, 1941. (Retrieved 2018, July 31st). Retrieved from http://pearl-harbor.com/arizona/casualtylist.html


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