Haughie History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Haughie surname is derived from the Gaelic Ó hEachaidh, or descendant of Eachaidh, an old Irish byname meaning "horseman."

Early Origins of the Haughie family

The surname Haughie was first found in Counties Donegal and Armagh (Irish: Ard Mhacha) located in the province of Ulster in present day Northern Ireland, in Northern Ireland where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the Haughie family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Haughie research. Another 130 words (9 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Haughie History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Haughie Spelling Variations

Names from the Middle Ages demonstrate many spelling variations. This is because the recording scribe or church official often decided as to how a person's name was spelt and in what language. Research into the name Haughie revealed many variations, including Haughie, Haughy, Haughey and others.

Early Notables of the Haughie family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Haughie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Haughie migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Haughie Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Haughie, (b. 1838), aged 36, British settler travelling from England aboard the ship "Varuna" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 27th May 1874 [1]
  • Mrs. Bridget Haughie, (b. 1839), aged 35, British settler travelling from England aboard the ship "Varuna" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 27th May 1874 [1]
  • Miss Annie Haughie, (b. 1866), aged 8, British settler travelling from England aboard the ship "Varuna" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 27th May 1874 [1]
  • Miss Sarah Haughie, (b. 1873), aged 5 months, British settler travelling from England aboard the ship "Varuna" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 27th May 1874 [1]
  • Mr. Joseph Haughie, (b. 1856), aged 18, British settler travelling from England aboard the ship "Varuna" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 27th May 1874 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


The Haughie Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Iterum iterumque
Motto Translation: Again and again.


  1. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook