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Hascude History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The ancestors of the Hascude surname lived among the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. The name comes from when they lived in the settlement of Hesket in Cumberland or in either of the places called Hesketh in Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire. The surname Hascude belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.

Early Origins of the Hascude family


The surname Hascude was first found in Lancashire where "in the year 1275, the 4th of Edward I., Sir William Heskayte, Knight, married the co-heiress of Fytton, and thus became possessed of Rufford, which has since remained the inheritance of this ancient family." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
Hesketh of Gwyrch Castle, Denbighshire claim descent from the Heskeths of Rossel, Lancashire who in turn claim descent from the original branch in Rufford. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
Rufford Old Hall, in Rufford, Lancashire built about 1530 for Sir Robert Hesketh is today a National Trust property.

It is believed that the property's Great Hall was in 1580, host of works by Shakespeare as one teacher noted "wilim Shakeshaft nowe dwellynge with me." Rufford New Hall is a former country house built by Sir Robert Hesketh in 1760.

The township of Shevington in Lancashire was home to the family since early times. "Before the general introduction of dates in the conveyance of landed property, a family existed denominating themselves from this township. The family of Hesketh have possessed property here for several ages, and have been considered as lords of the manor. In the township are a number of ancient mansions: the old Hall or manor-house, the property of the Heskeths, is of the date 1653." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

The parish of Rufford, also in Lancashire was later the family seat of Sir Thomas George Hesketh. There he had New Hall built. "On the north side of the family pew of the Heskeths, is a venerable marble slab, on which are represented a knight and his lady, the former being Thomas Hesketh, who died Oct. 1363." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Hascude family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hascude research.
Another 275 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1330, 1592, 1606, 1644, 1539, 1588, 1563, 1653, 1597, 1598 and 1846 are included under the topic Early Hascude History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hascude Spelling Variations


Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Hascude include Hesketh, Hascoit, Haskett, Hesket, Heskett, Heskit, Heskitt and many more.

Early Notables of the Hascude family (pre 1700)


Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Robert Hesketh, of Rufford (died 1539), knighted by Henry VIII for his valour in France; and his son, Sir Thomas Hesketh (died 1588), High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1563; and his son, Robert...
Another 41 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hascude Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hascude family to the New World and Oceana


A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants: William Hesketh settled in New England in 1750; Sarah and Mary Haskett arrived in Philadelphia in 1822 with a child; John Hesketh arrived in Philadelphia in 1873..

The Hascude Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quod tibi, hoc alteri
Motto Translation: Do unto others what you would want done to yourself.


Hascude Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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