Goldie History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

A family of Strathclyde-Briton were the first to use the name Goldie. They lived in Edinburghshire, where the family was found since the early Middle Ages. Goldie is an ancient Scottish name that evolved from the Goldie, which derives from the Old English personal name Gold.

Early Origins of the Goldie family

The surname Goldie was first found in Edinburghshire, a former county, now part of the Midlothian council area where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Important Dates for the Goldie family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Goldie research. Another 126 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1643, 1567, 1783, 1847, 1576 and 1689 are included under the topic Early Goldie History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Goldie Spelling Variations

In the era before dictionaries, there were no rules governing the spelling or translation of names or any other words. Consequently, there are an enormous number of spelling variations in Medieval Scottish names. Goldie has appeared as Goudie, Gouday, Goudey, Goudy, Gowdy, Gowdie, Gadie, Goodie, Gady and many more.

Early Notables of the Goldie family (pre 1700)

Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Goldie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Goldie family to Ireland

Some of the Goldie family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 32 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Goldie migration to the United States

The freedom, opportunity, and land of the North American colonies beckoned. There, Scots found a place where they were generally free from persecution and where they could go on to become important players in the birth of new nations. Some fought in the American War of Independence, while others went north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. The ancestors of all of these Scottish settlers have been able to recover their lost national heritage in the last century through highland games and Clan societies in North America. Among them:

Goldie Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • William Goldie, who arrived in Maryland in 1671 [1]
Goldie Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • George Goldie, who arrived in Virginia in 1766 [1]
  • Catherine Goldie, who landed in Virginia in 1785 [1]
Goldie Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Richard Goldie, who landed in Iowa in 1876 [1]

Goldie migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Goldie Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • David Goldie, a cartwright, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Catherine Goldie, aged 18, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "John Bunyan" [2]

Goldie migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Goldie Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • John Goldie, aged 21, a square wright, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Martha Ridgeway" in 1840
  • Barbara Goldie, aged 21, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Martha Ridgeway" in 1840
  • Mr. John Goldie, (b. 1819), aged 21, British square wright travelling from England aboard the ship "Martha Ridgway" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 14th November 1840 [3]
  • Mrs. Barbara Goldie, (b. 1819), aged 21, British settler travelling from England aboard the ship "Martha Ridgway" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 14th November 1840 [3]
  • John Goldie, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1843
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Goldie (post 1700)

  • Daniel "Dan" C. Goldie (b. 1963), American former tennis player, ranked no. 27, April 17, 1989
  • Malcolm Goldie (b. 1893), Scottish-American soccer
  • Charles Frederick Goldie OBE (1870-1947), New Zealand painter, best known for his portrayal of Maori dignitaries
  • John Haviland Dashwood Goldie (1849-1896), English rower, and barrister
  • Grace Wyndham Goldie (1900-1986), née Grace Murrell Nisbet, Scottish producer and executive in British television for twenty years
  • David Goldie (1946-2002), British priest in the Church of England, Archdeacon of Buckingham (1998-2002)
  • David Goldie (1842-1926), Tasmanian-born, New Zealand politician, Mayor of Auckland City from 1898 to 1901 and a Member of Parliament in New Zealand
  • Annabel MacNicoll Goldie DL (b. 1950), Baroness Goldie, a British politician, Leader of the Scottish Conservatives between 2005 and 2011
  • Edward Goldie (1856-1921), English ecclesiastical architect, known for his Roman Catholic churches
  • Alfred William Goldie (1920-2005), English mathematician who developed Goldie's theorem, sometimes referred to as Goldie Ring
  • ... (Another 10 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Citations

  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ South Australian Register Wednesday 24th May 1854. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) John Bunyan 1854. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/johnbunyan1854.shtml
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
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