Gibb History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The saga of the Gibb family name begins among the people of an ancient Scottish tribe called the Picts. The Gibb name is derived from Gibb, which is a pet form of the personal name Gilbert. This name is derived from the Old English forenames Gislberht and Gislbeorht, which mean bright hostage.

Early Origins of the Gibb family

The surname Gibb was first found in Inverness-shire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Nis) divided between the present day Scottish Council Areas of Highland and Western Isles, and consisting of a large northern mainland area and various island areas off the west coast, the shire was anciently both a Pictish and Norwegian stronghold, where they held a family seat from very early times.

Early History of the Gibb family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gibb research. Another 129 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1521, 1585, 1622, 1689, 1654, 1656, 1677, 1681, 1651, 1681, 1604, 1681, 1603, 1604, 1611, 1677 and are included under the topic Early Gibb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Gibb Spelling Variations

Repeated and inaccurate translation of Scottish names from Gaelic to English and back resulted in a wide variety of spelling variations with single names. Gibb has appeared Gibb, Gibbe, Gibbs, Gibbes and others.

Early Notables of the Gibb family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the Clan at this time was William Gibbes (died 1689), an English merchant and politician, Member of Parliament for Suffolk (1654-1656), High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1677. Frederick Gibb (d. 1681), was a miscellaneous writer, son of Bernard Gibb, advocate and was born at Dunfermline, studied medicine, and took, 9 Sept. 1651, the degree of doctor at the university of Valence. He spent his life abroad. He died 27 March...
Another 71 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Gibb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Gibb family to Ireland

Some of the Gibb family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 50 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Gibb migration to the United States +

Many Scottish families suffered enormous hardships and were compelled to leave their country of birth. They traveled to Ireland and Australia, but mostly to the colonies of North America, where many found the freedom and opportunity they sought. It was not without a fight, though, as many were forced to stand up and defend their freedom in the American War of Independence. The ancestors of these Scots abroad have rediscovered their heritage in the last century through the Clan societies and other organizations that have sprung up across North America. Immigration and passenger ship lists show some important early immigrants bearing the name Gibb:

Gibb Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Andrew Gibb, who joined the "Gardiners," who bought Long Island from the native North Americans in 1655
  • James Gibb, who settled in Maryland in 1674
  • John Gibb, who arrived in East New Jersey in 1685
Gibb Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Alexander Gibb, who settled in Maryland in 1730
Gibb Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James Gibb, who landed in America in 1801 [1]
  • John Gibb, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1823 [1]
  • David Gibb, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1841 [1]
  • Andrew Gibb, who landed in Mississippi in 1844 [1]

Canada Gibb migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Gibb Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Robert Gibb, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
Gibb Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Hugh Gibb, aged 23, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Bartley" in 1833
  • Mrs. Mary Gibb, aged 32 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Virgilia" departing 22nd July 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 20th September 1847 but she died on board [2]

Australia Gibb migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Gibb Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • George Gibb, Scottish convict from Edinburgh, who was transported aboard the "Agamemnon" on April 22, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia [3]
  • William Gibb, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Lysander" in 1840 [4]
  • Henry William Gibb, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Fama" in 1841 [5]
  • James Gordon Gibb, aged 41, a cabinet maker, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Catherine" in 1851 [6]
  • Elizabeth Gibb, aged 42, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Catherine" in 1851 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Gibb migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Gibb Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Peter Gibb, Scottish settler from Dunfermline travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Strathfieldsaye" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 29th April 1858 [7]
  • Mr. Stewart Gibb, (b. 1836), aged 24, British shepherd travelling from Bristol aboard the ship "Matoaka" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 2nd December 1860 [8]
  • Mr. Charles Gibb, Scottish settler travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Storm Cloud" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 30th July 1861 [7]
  • Mrs. Gibb, Scottish settler with 4 children travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Storm Cloud" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 30th July 1861 [7]
  • James Gibb, aged 25, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Accrington" in 1863
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Gibb (post 1700) +

  • Russ "Uncle" Gibb (1931-2019), American concert promoter, and media personality from Dearborn, Michigan, best known for his role in the Paul is Dead phenomenon
  • Robert D. Gibb, American fighter pilot and flying ace in the U.S. Army Air Forces, during World War II, credited with 5 aerial victories
  • Matthew Gibb, American politician, Supervisor of Orion Township, Michigan, 2009 [9]
  • Laurence V. Gibb (1899-1967), American Republican politician, Justice of the peace; Investigator [9]
  • David N. Gibb (1806-1886), American politician, Member of Vermont State House of Representatives, 1866, 1868-69 [9]
  • Robert Gibb (d. 1837), Scottish landscape-painter, a native of Dundee, an associate of the Royal Institution, Edinburgh
  • Sir Alexander Gibb (1872-1958), Scottish civil engineer, fifth generation in a line of civil engineers begun by his great-great-grandfather William (1736-91)
  • Sir Andrew Dewar Gibb (1888-1974), Scottish jurist probably best known for his position as chairman of the Scottish National Party (1936-40)
  • Sir Frank Gibb (1928-2013), British construction executive, CEO and Chairman of Taylor Woodrow
  • Andrew Roy Gibb (1958-1988), English born, Australian singer, one of the "the BeeGees"
  • ... (Another 3 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Cornwall
  • Charles Alexander Gibb, British Captain Paymaster aboard the HMS Cornwall when she was struck by air bombers and sunk; he survived the sinking [10]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Stanley D Gibb (b. 1919), Scottish Wireman serving for the Royal Navy from Dundee, Angus, Scotland, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [11]


The Gibb Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Tenax propositi
Motto Translation: Firm of purpose.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 77)
  3. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Agamemnon voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1820 with 179 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/agamemnon/1820
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) LYSANDER 1840. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840Lysander.htm
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) FAMA 1841. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1841Fama.gif
  6. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) CATHERINE 1851. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1851Catherine.htm
  7. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  8. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  9. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 9) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  10. ^ Force Z Survivors Crew List HMS Cornwall (Retrieved 2018, February 13th) - Retrieved from https://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listcornwallcrew.html#A
  11. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm


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