Show ContentsGautiaie History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Gautiaie is from the Languedoc region of southern France, it came from the Old French personal name, Gauldheri, which means army ruler. This name was adopted by a person who held a commanding position in a medieval French army.

Early Origins of the Gautiaie family

The surname Gautiaie was first found in Languedoc, where this illustrious family held a family seat with lands and manor. The Gauthier of Savignac family was granted the title of the Lords of Doumairène and in the late 11th century, they contributed to the foundation of Villefranche.

Descending from the original line of Rouergue, the members of this illustrious family branched to Quercy in 1454 where Jean Gauthier was granted the right to be the Co-Lord of Savignac and Cabanes. As a result of the Gauthiers' involvement in their community, this eminent family received their letters patent confirming their noble status on June 2, 1669.

Many branches of the family formed with different spellings due to the cultural and linguistic variations throughout France over the centuries. The Gaultier of Girenton family were the Lords of Châteauneuf of Rouge, Lirac, Le Poët, Costebrune, Lauriol and the Marquis of Châteauneuf in 1723.

Continuing to branch under names of spellings, the Gautier family provided the Lords of Grambois, Mille and Rustrel, a Councillor of Marseille in 1568 and a Secretary to the King in 1624. As well, this branch provided the Lords of Aiguines, Canjuers, Clumans, barons of Senez and three Knights of Malta from 1643 to 1717.

Jean Gauthier, born in 1645, son of Mathurin and Catherine, was a French edge-tool maker that travelled from France to Canada in the 17th century. After arriving in the province of Quebec he married Angélique Lefebvre, daughter of Louis and Suzanne, on 21st January 1675. [1]

Early History of the Gautiaie family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gautiaie research. Another 168 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1454, 1568, 1624, 1642, 1643, 1669, 1700, 1714, 1717, 1723, 1746, 1772, 1778, and 1788 are included under the topic Early Gautiaie History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Gautiaie Spelling Variations

There were a great number of spelling variations in French surnames. One reason for this was the wide variety of cultural influences present in France during the early development of the French language. The many spelling variations of the name include Gauthier, Gauthié, Gauthyer, Gauthyé, Gauthiait, Gauthiai, Gauthiaie, Gauthiay, Gauthiez, Gothier, Gothié, Gothyé, Gothyer, Gothiait, Gothiai, Gothiaie, Gothiay, Gothiez, Gauthyait, Gauthyai, Gauthyaie, Gauthyay, Gauthyez, Gautier, Gauithier, Gautiez, Gautiait, Gautiaie, Gautiaies, Gautiais, Gautiai, Gautyer, Gautyez, Gautyait, Gautyaie, Gautyaies, Gautyaie, Gautyais, Gautherii and many more.

Early Notables of the Gautiaie family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Gautiaie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Gautiaie family

France was active as a cultural leader in the early 16th century. One particular area in which they lead was the exploration of the New World. The explorers, like Jacques Cartier in 1534, led the way to North America. Champlain, in 1608, made the first of twenty voyages to France to attract settlers and brought the first migrant in 1617. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec, and the French Acadian presence in the Maritimes had reached 500. The French founded Lower Canada, thus becoming one of the two great founding nations of Canada. The family name Gautiaie has made many distinguished contributions in France and New France to the world of science, culture, religion, and education. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Gautiaie were Joseph Gauthier, aged 32; settled in New York in 1821; Charles Gautier settled in New York in 1838; J.J. Gautier aged 32; settled in New Orleans in 1823.



  1. Olivier, Reginald L. Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties. Logan: The Everton Publishers, Inc., P.O. Box 368, 1972. Print


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