Show ContentsGamelyan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Gamelyan was formed many centuries ago by the ancient Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It was a name typically given to a person who was referred to as gamall, which was the Old Norman word for old.

Gameline (d. 1271), was Lord-Chancellor of Scotland and Bishop of St. Andrews, "one of the ‘Clerici Regis Alexandri II’ and archdeacon of St. Andrews. He was made Lord-Chancellor in 1250, and in 1254 was appointed one of the chaplains of Pope Innocent IV." [1]

Early Origins of the Gamelyan family

The surname Gamelyan was first found in Somerset, where an Odo filius Gamelin was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. [2] They have also been found in Huntingdonshire and Oxfordshire since early times.

Early History of the Gamelyan family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gamelyan research. Another 99 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1273, 1086, 1379, 1625, 1666, 1737, 1271, 1255 and 1271 are included under the topic Early Gamelyan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Gamelyan Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Gamelyan include Gamelin, Gamelyn, Gamlyn, Gimlin, Gamlin, Gamblin, Gambling, Gambeling and many more.

Early Notables of the Gamelyan family (pre 1700)

Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Gamelyan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Gamelyan family

A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants: Elizabeth, Mary and Robert Gamlin, who sailed to Massachusetts in 1632; Josias Gambling to Virginia in 1636; and William Gambling to Philadelphia in 1846..



  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)


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