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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2015

Where did the English Frink family come from? What is the English Frink family crest and coat of arms? When did the Frink family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Frink family history?

Frink is a name of Anglo-Saxon origin. It was a name given to a person who was referred to as being free or generous. The surname was originally derived from the Old French franc, which meant "liberal, generous." In this case, the name would have been initially bestowed as a nickname either on someone who was generous or in an ironic way on someone who was stingy. The surname also has origins from the Norman official title, the frank which also means free. To confuse matters more, the surname could have been derived from the Norman personal name "Franc," which was originally an ethnic name for one of Frankish race.

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Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Frink were recorded, including Frank, Franks, Franke, Frankes, Frenk, Frink and many more.

First found in the Domesday Book where bearers of the name Frink were granted lands in Shropshire, Yorkshire, Norfolk, and Surrey. The name appears with some frequency in various counties between the 11th and 14th centuries; early bearers of the name include Ricardus filius Franke, who was living in London in 1188, and Ricardus Franc, who was listed in the Curia Regis Rolls of Essex in 1201.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Frink research. Another 171 words(12 lines of text) covering the years 1273, 1613, 1664, 1640, 1775, 1624 and 1708 are included under the topic Early Frink History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 77 words(6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Frink Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Frink family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 47 words(3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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To escape oppression and starvation at that time, many English families left for the "open frontiers" of the New World with all its perceived opportunities. In droves people migrated to the many British colonies, those in North America in particular, paying high rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Although many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, those who did see the shores of North America perceived great opportunities before them. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the Frink family emigrate to North America:

Frink Settlers in United States in the 17th Century


  • Thomas Frink, who settled in New England in 1699
  • Thomas Frink, who landed in New England in 1699

Frink Settlers in United States in the 18th Century


  • Christopher Frink, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1765

Frink Settlers in United States in the 19th Century


  • William F. Frink, who was naturalized in Newhaven, Connecticut in 1845
  • N Frink, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850
  • S Frink, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850
  • S A Frink, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850
  • L Frink, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851


Frink Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century


  • Mr. Hester Frink U.E., "Cuyler" (b. 1759) born in Holland who settled in Carleton [Saint John City], New Brunswick c. 1784 he died in 1824 in St. Stephens
  • Capt. Nathan Frink U.E. born in Pomfret, Connecticut, USA who settled in Carleton [Saint John City], New Brunswick c. 1784 he served in the American Legion

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The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non nobis nati
Motto Translation: Born not for ourselves

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  1. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  2. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  3. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  4. Virkus, Frederick A. Ed. Immigrant Ancestors A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America Before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1964. Print.
  5. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  6. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  7. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  8. Thirsk, Joan. The Agrarian History of England and Wales. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 7 Volumes. Print.
  9. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  10. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  11. ...

The Frink Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Frink Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 7 April 2015 at 15:58.

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