Fludd History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Irish surname Fludd begins was originally the Gaelic MacTuile, O Maoltuile, or Mac Maoltuile. "tuile" means "flood," and the names Tully and Flood were at one time interchangeable in Ireland. However, some of the Gaelic names that have become "flood" may have been mistranslations, and that contained the Gaelic "toile," meaning "toil," or "will." In Ulster, Floyd has sometimes been used as a spelling variant of Flood; however, Floyd is normally a cognate of the Welsh name Lloyd, derived from the word 'llwyd,' which means ‘grey.’

Early Origins of the Fludd family

The surname Fludd was first found in Connacht, where they could be found since ancient times, and were hereditary physicians to the O'Connors of Galway.

Early History of the Fludd family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Fludd research. Another 125 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1620, 1676, 1660, 1675, 1648, 1563, 1641, 1563, 1572, 1649, 1572, 1603, 1589, 1592, 1593, 1574 and 1637 are included under the topic Early Fludd History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Fludd Spelling Variations

Within the archives researched, many different spelling variations of the surname Fludd were found. These included One reason for the many variations is that scribes and church officials often spelled an individual's name as it sounded. This imprecise method often led to many versions. Flood, Floyd, Floode, Floyde, Tully, MacTully,Talley, Tally and many more.

Early Notables of the Fludd family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family name at this time was Thomas Tully (1620-1676), an English clergyman of Calvinist views. He was born in St. Mary's parish, Carlisle and was son of George Tully. "After the Restoration he was created D.D. on 9 Nov. 1660, and nominated one of the Royal Chaplains in Ordinary, and in April 1675 was appointed Dean of Ripon. " [1] Edward Floyd, Floud or LLoyd (d. 1648?), was a Catholic barrister who became steward in Shropshire to Lord-Chancellor Ellesmere and the Earl of Suffolk. [1] Henry Floyd (1563-1641), was an English Jesuit, elder brother of Father John Floyd, born in...
Another 119 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Fludd Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Fludd Ranking

In the United States, the name Fludd is the 16,946th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [2]


United States Fludd migration to the United States +

During the 19th century thousands of impoverished Irish families made the long journey to British North America and the United States. These people were leaving a land that had become beset with poverty, lack of opportunity, and hunger. In North America, they hoped to find land, work, and political and religious freedoms. Although the majority of the immigrants that survived the long sea passage did make these discoveries, it was not without much perseverance and hard work: by the mid-19th century land suitable for agriculture was short supply, especially in British North America, in the east; the work available was generally low paying and physically taxing construction or factory work; and the English stereotypes concerning the Irish, although less frequent and vehement, were, nevertheless, present in the land of freedom, liberty, and equality for all men. The largest influx of Irish settlers occurred with Great Potato Famine during the late 1840s. Research into passenger and immigration lists has brought forth evidence of the early members of the Fludd family in North America:

Fludd Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Fludd, who landed in Virginia in 1610 [3]
  • Margret Fludd, who landed in Virginia in 1620 [3]
  • John, Fludd Jr., who arrived in Virginia in 1638 [3]

West Indies Fludd migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [4]
Fludd Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Fludd, (b. 1614), aged 21, British settler travelling from London, England aboard the ship "Alexander" arriving in Barbados in 1635 [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Fludd (post 1700) +

  • Robert Fludd (1574-1637), English physician


The Fludd Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vis unita fortior
Motto Translation: Strength united is the more powerful.


  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  5. ^ Pilgrim Ship Lists Early 1600's retrieved 28th September 2021. (Retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)


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