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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2017


The Irish surname Flook begins was originally the Gaelic MacTuile, O Maoltuile, or Mac Maoltuile. "tuile" means "flood," and the names Tully and Flood were at one time interchangeable in Ireland. However, some of the Gaelic names that have become "flood" may have been mistranslations, and that contained the Gaelic "toile," meaning "toil," or "will." In Ulster, Floyd has sometimes been used as a spelling variant of Flood; however, Floyd is normally a cognate of the Welsh name Lloyd, derived from the word 'llwyd,' which means ‘grey.’

Flook Early Origins



The surname Flook was first found in Connacht, where they could be found since ancient times, and were hereditary physicians to the O'Connors of Galway.

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Flook Spelling Variations


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Flook Spelling Variations



The recording of names in Ireland during the Middle Ages was an inconsistent endeavor at best. Since the general population did not know how to read or write, they could only specify how their names should be recorded orally. Research into the name Flook revealed spelling variations, including Flood, Floyd, Floode, Floyde, Tully, MacTully,Talley, Tally and many more.

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Flook Early History


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Flook Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Flook research. Another 249 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1st., 1620 and 1676 are included under the topic Early Flook History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Flook Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Flook Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 21 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Flook Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Flook Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • George Flook, aged 42, a cooper, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Dilharree" in 1875
  • Ann Flook, aged 43, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Dilharree" in 1875
  • Ann Flook, aged 19, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Dilharree" in 1875
  • Emily Flook, aged 16, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Dilharree" in 1875
  • Louisa Flook, aged 13, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Dilharree" in 1875
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Contemporary Notables of the name Flook (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Flook (post 1700)



  • Maria Flook, American writer of fiction and non-fiction, Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at Emerson College in Boston, winner of the 2007 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Award
  • John Gurley Flook (1839-1926), American businessman, farmer and politician, Member of the Oregon State Legislature
  • Chris Flook (b. 1973), Bermudan silver and bronze medalist swimmer
  • Adrian John Flook (b. 1963), British Conservative politician, Member of Parliament for Taunton (2001-2005)

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vis unita fortior
Motto Translation: Strength united is the more powerful.


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Flook Family Crest Products


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Flook Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Fitzgerald, Thomas W. Ireland and Her People A Library of Irish Biography 5 Volumes. Chicago: Fitzgerald. Print.
    2. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
    3. Grehan, Ida. Dictionary of Irish Family Names. Boulder: Roberts Rinehart, 1997. Print. (ISBN 1-57098-137-X).
    4. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    5. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
    6. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    7. Vicars, Sir Arthur. Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
    8. Johnson, Daniel F. Irish Emigration to New England Through the Port of Saint John, New Brunswick Canada 1841-1849. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield, 1996. Print.
    9. McDonnell, Frances. Emigrants from Ireland to America 1735-1743 A Transcription of the report of the Irish House of Commons into Enforced emigration to America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1331-5).
    10. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
    11. ...

    The Flook Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Flook Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 20 November 2017 at 21:11.

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