Fawcus History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Fawcus is a name that was carried to England in the great wave of migration from Normandy following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Fawcus family lived in Essex. The name, however, derives from the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, Vaux, Normandy.

Early Origins of the Fawcus family

The surname Fawcus was first found in Essex where Robert de Vals, de Valibus, de Vaux was first listed shortly after the Conquest. [1] However, the name was scattered throughout early Britain due to their strong Norman ancestry. Aitard de Vaux held estates in Norfolk in 1086 as did Randulph de Vaux in Cumberland. [2] In part, this was due to the origin of the name "Vaux," a fairly common French place name which is plural of the word "val" which means in English "valley." [1] The "V" and "F" prefix was interchangeable at this time.

Early History of the Fawcus family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Fawcus research. Another 93 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1570, 1606, 1605, 1675 and 1732 are included under the topic Early Fawcus History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Fawcus Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, Norman French and other languages became incorporated into English throughout the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Fawcus include Faux, Fawkes, Fauks and others.

Early Notables of the Fawcus family (pre 1700)

Another 44 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Fawcus Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Fawcus migration to the United States +

In England at this time, the uncertainty of the political and religious environment of the time caused many families to board ships for distant British colonies in the hopes of finding land and opportunity, and escaping persecution. The voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, though, and many arrived in North America sick, starved, and destitute. Those who did make it, however, were greeted with greater opportunities and freedoms that they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Early immigration records have shown some of the first Fawcuss to arrive on North American shores:

Fawcus Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Fawcus, aged 26, originally from Glasgow, arrived in New York in 1892 aboard the ship "Ethiopia" from Glasgow, Scotland [3]
  • Chas. O. Fawcus, aged 36, originally from London, arrived in New York in 1892 aboard the ship "City of New York" from Liverpool, England [4]
Fawcus Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Margaret Fawcus, aged 40, originally from Birmingham, England, arrived in New York in 1915 aboard the ship "Saint Paul" from Liverpool, England [5]
  • Russel Evans Fawcus, aged 35, originally from Ewell, England arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Adriatic" from Southampton, England [6]
  • Kathleen Barbara Fawcus, aged 28, originally from London, England arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Adriatic" from Southampton, England [7]
  • Russell Evans Fawcus, aged 38, originally from Ewell, England, arrived in New York in 1922 aboard the ship "Aquitania" from Southampton, England [8]
  • Russell Evans Fawcus, aged 40, originally from Ewell, England, arrived in New York in 1924 aboard the ship "Majestic" from Southampton, England [9]

Contemporary Notables of the name Fawcus (post 1700) +

  • William Fawcus (b. 1850), British rower who won the Wingfield Sculls and the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley Royal Regatta in 1871


The Fawcus Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: A Deo et Rege
Motto Translation: From God and the king.


  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6R7-DZN : 6 December 2014), Thomas Fawcus, 22 Sep 1892; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Ethiopia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6R2-CQS : 6 December 2014), Chas. O. Fawcus, 06 Oct 1892; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name City of New York, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJWK-TPJ : 6 December 2014), Margaret Fawcus, 13 Jun 1915; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Saint Paul, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6W6-SM8 : 6 December 2014), Russel Evans Fawcus, 17 Oct 1919; citing departure port Southampton, England, arrival port New York, ship name Adriatic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  7. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6W6-SMD : 6 December 2014), Kathleen Barbara Fawcus, 17 Oct 1919; citing departure port Southampton, England, arrival port New York, ship name Adriatic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  8. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNQ1-5JM : 6 December 2014), Russell Evans Fawcus, 25 Feb 1922; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name Aquitania, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  9. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNZH-T3Y : 6 December 2014), Russell Evans Fawcus, 30 Jan 1924; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name Majestic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).


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