Durran History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Gaelic is at the heart of all the Irish surnames that can be found throughout the world today. The original Gaelic form of the name Durran is O Deoradhain, which was later shortened to O Deorain. Both names are probably derived from the word deoradh, referring to an exile.

Early Origins of the Durran family

The surname Durran was first found in Leix (Irish: Laois) formerly known as Queen's County, located in central Ireland, in Leinster Province, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the Durran family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Durran research. Another 212 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1523, 1540, 1807, 1814, 1835, 1878, and 1885 are included under the topic Early Durran History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Durran Spelling Variations

Scribes and church officials, lacking today's standardized spelling rules, recorded names by how they were pronounced. This imprecise guide often led to the misleading result of one person's name being recorded under several different spellings. Numerous spelling variations of the surname Durran are preserved in documents of the family history. The various spellings of the name that were found include Doran, Dorran, O'Doran, O'Deorain, Dorain, Doron and others.

Early Notables of the Durran family (pre 1700)

Notable among the family name at this time was Maurice Doran, Bishop of Leighlin who was murdered by his archdeacon in 1523; Charles Guilfoyle Doran (1835-1909), Irish...
Another 26 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Durran Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Durran migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Durran Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Durran, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Palmyra" arriving in Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 19th February 1858 [1]
  • Mrs. Durran, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Palmyra" arriving in Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 19th February 1858 [1]


  1. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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