Dobinson History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Dobinson is a name whose history on English soil dates back to the wave of migration that followed the Norman Conquest of England of 1066. The Dobinson family lived in Staffordshire. This family was originally from St. Aubin, Normandy, and it is from the local form of this place-name, D'Aubin, which literally translates as from Aubin, that their surname derives. [1]

Some sources notes note that the name is a diminutive of Dobb, which itself is a pet diminutive of Robert. [2] [3]

Early Origins of the Dobinson family

The surname Dobinson was first found in Staffordshire as a forename, Dobin de Hatton who was listed in the Assize Rolls of 1203. A few years later, Dobin Cusin was listed in the Curia Regis Rolls for Devon in 1221. The first record of the name as a surname was Hugo and Robert Dobin who were listed in the Curia Regis Rolls for Herefordshire in 1207 and later in the Assize Rolls for Berkshire in 1227. [4]

Hugo Dobin was recorded in the Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, King John. [5]

Early History of the Dobinson family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dobinson research. Another 92 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1539, 1674, 1641 and are included under the topic Early Dobinson History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dobinson Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Dobyns, Dobbins, Dobbings, Dobyn, Dobbin, Dobbyn and many more.

Early Notables of the Dobinson family (pre 1700)

Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dobinson Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Dobinson family to Ireland

Some of the Dobinson family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 123 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Dobinson migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Dobinson Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Edward Dobinson, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Stebonheath" in 1849 [6]
  • Frances Dobinson, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Stebonheath" in 1849 [6]
  • Catherine Dobinson, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Stebonheath" in 1849 [6]
  • William Dobinson, aged 26, who arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "Lord of the Isles" [7]
  • Margaret Dobinson, aged 26, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Norman"

Contemporary Notables of the name Dobinson (post 1700) +

  • William Dobinson Halliburton FRS (1860-1931), British physiologist, one of the founders of the science of biochemistry


The Dobinson Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Re e merito
Motto Translation: This through merit.


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York, Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Barber, Henry, British Family Names London: Elliot Stock, 62 Paternoster Row, 1894. Print.
  6. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) STEBONHEATH 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Stebonheath.htm
  7. ^ South Australian Register Monday 14th August 1854. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Lord of the Isles 1854. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/jamesfernie1854.shtml


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