Dingwell History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The story of the Dingwell family stretches back through time to the Viking settlers who populated the rugged shores of Scotland in the Medieval era. The Dingwell name comes from a place named by these Vikings and was used by a family who lived at Royal Burgh of Dingwall, in Ross-shire, Scotland. The place-name is derived from the Old English word dingle, which meant valley or hollow. This is a habitation surname, derived from an already existing place-name.

Early Origins of the Dingwell family

The surname Dingwell was first found in Ross-shire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Rois) a former county, now part of the Council Areas of Highland and Western Isles in Northern Scotland, which emerged from the Gaelic lordship of the Earl of Ross, where John Yonger of Dyngvale witnessed a charter by William, Earl of Ross in 1342. Another charter by the same earl was witnessed by John called Yong and Thomas, his brother (c. 1350-72.) A few years later, William of Dyngwale was listed as dean of Aberdeen and Ross in 1389. Thomas of Dyngvale was listed as a canon in 1451. [1]

Early History of the Dingwell family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dingwell research. Another 134 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1452, 140 and 1538 are included under the topic Early Dingwell History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dingwell Spelling Variations

In the Middle Ages, no real standards were established to judge the accuracy of spelling and translation. They were done mostly by ear and intuition, and enormous numbers of spelling variations were the unsurprising result. Dingwell has appeared as Dingwall, Dingwalls, Dingall, Dingell, Dingle, Dingill, Dingal, Dingel and many more.

Early Notables of the Dingwell family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Dingwell Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Dingwell migration to the United States +

North America was far from Britain's oppressive monarchy. There, the Scottish found land and freedom, and many even the opportunity to pay back England in the American War of Independence. This brave heritage survives today largely in Clan societies and other patriotic Scottish organizations. Research into passenger and immigration lists has brought forth evidence of the early members of the Dingwell family in North America:

Dingwell Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • John Dingwell, who arrived in Virginia in 1705 [2]
  • Philip Dingwell, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1745 [2]

Canada Dingwell migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Dingwell Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Arthur Dingwell U.E. born in Aberdeen, Scotland who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1784 [3]
  • Mr. James Dingwell U.E. who settled in Eastern District [Cornwall], Ontario c. 1786 [3]
  • Mr. John Dingwell U.E. who settled in Eastern District [Cornwall], Ontario c. 1786 [3]

Australia Dingwell migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Dingwell Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. David Dingwell, (b. 1806), aged 35, Scottish mason from Perth, Scotland departing on 8th July 1841 from Greenock, Scotland aboard the ship "New York Packet" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 23rd October 1841 [4]
  • Mrs. Margaret Dingwell, (b. 1809), aged 32, Scottish servant from Glasgow, Scotland departing on 8th July 1841 from Greenock, Scotland aboard the ship "New York Packet" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 23rd October 1841 [5]
  • Mr. William Dingwell, (b. 1829), aged 12, Scottish settler from Glasgow, Scotland departing on 8th July 1841 from Greenock, Scotland aboard the ship "New York Packet" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 23rd October 1841 [6]
  • Miss Elizabeth Dingwell, (b. 1831), aged 10, Scottish settler from Glasgow, Scotland departing on 8th July 1841 from Greenock, Scotland aboard the ship "New York Packet" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 23rd October 1841 [7]
  • Miss Barbara Dingwell, (b. 1832), aged 9, Scottish settler from Glasgow, Scotland departing on 8th July 1841 from Greenock, Scotland aboard the ship "New York Packet" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 23rd October 1841 [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Dingwell migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Dingwell Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Dingwell, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Josephine Willis" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 5th February 1855 [9]

Contemporary Notables of the name Dingwell (post 1700) +

  • Clare Dingwell, American Faculty Assistant at Harvard University, Department of Economics
  • Robert Earl Dingwell (1922-1990), American Democratic Party politician, Member of Michigan State House of Representatives 58th District, 1965-66; Defeated, 1954, 1956, 1958, 1966, 1968 [10]
  • E. W. Dingwell, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1912 [10]
  • Joyce Dingwell (1908-1997), born Enid Joyce Owen Starr, an Australian writer of more than 80 romance novels who wrote under the pseudonym of Kate Starr


The Dingwell Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Deo favente
Motto Translation: By the favour of God.


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  4. ^ Ship Voyages to New South Wales (Retrieved 18th November 2020). Retrieved from http://indexes.records.nsw.gov.au/ebook/list.aspx?Page=NRS5316/4_4782/New%20York%20Packet_23%20Oct%201841/4_478200095.jpg&No=28
  5. ^ Ship Voyages to New South Wales (Retrieved 18th November 2020). Retrieved from http://indexes.records.nsw.gov.au/ebook/list.aspx?Page=NRS5316/4_4782/New%20York%20Packet_23%20Oct%201841/4_478200095.jpg&No=29
  6. ^ Ship Voyages to New South Wales (Retrieved 18th November 2020). Retrieved from http://indexes.records.nsw.gov.au/ebook/list.aspx?Page=NRS5316/4_4782/New%20York%20Packet_23%20Oct%201841/4_478200095.jpg&No=30
  7. ^ Ship Voyages to New South Wales (Retrieved 18th November 2020). Retrieved from http://indexes.records.nsw.gov.au/ebook/list.aspx?Page=NRS5316/4_4782/New%20York%20Packet_23%20Oct%201841/4_478200095.jpg&No=31
  8. ^ Ship Voyages to New South Wales (Retrieved 18th November 2020). Retrieved from http://indexes.records.nsw.gov.au/ebook/list.aspx?Page=NRS5316/4_4782/New%20York%20Packet_23%20Oct%201841/4_478200095.jpg&No=32
  9. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  10. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, December 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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