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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The name Dimmack reached English shores for the first time with the ancestors of the Dimmack family as they migrated following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Dimmack family lived in Gloucestershire. The name is derived from the local of Dymock, a village in this county. Dymock was the home of the Dymock poets (1911 to 1914) that included Robert Frost, Lascelles Abercrombie, Rupert Brooke, Edward Thomas, Wilfrid Wilson Gibson, and John Drinkwater. The homes of Robert Frost and Wilfrid Wilson Gibson can still be seen there today.

Dimmack Early Origins



The surname Dimmack was first found in Gloucestershire where the village and parish of Dymock dates back to before the Norman Conquest. According to the Domesday Book, Dymock was held by King Edward at that time and was part of the Botloe hundred. It goes on to mention that King William held it in demesne for 4 years and after that, Earl William held it followed by his son Roger. It was sizable as there was land there for 41 ploughs and a priest held another 12 acres at the time. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
Today the village comprises over 7,000 acres. The name Dymock was possibly derived from the Celtic word "din" which meant "fort" [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Another reference claims that name was derived from the Saxon words "dim" for dark, + "ac" for oak, in other words "dark oak." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Remains can be seen of an ancient hall in Howell, Lincolnshire, the seat of the Dymoke family at one time. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Dimmack Spelling Variations


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Dimmack Spelling Variations



Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Dimmack family name include Dymoke, Dymock, Dimock, Dimoke and others.

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Dimmack Early History


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Dimmack Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dimmack research. Another 201 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1381, 1500, 1566, 1531, 1580, 1428, 1471, 1469, 1471 and 1546 are included under the topic Early Dimmack History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Dimmack Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Dimmack Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir John Dymoke (died 1381), held the manor of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire; Margaret Dymoke (ca.1500-?), of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire, lady-in-waiting at the court of Henry VIII of England; Sir Edward Dymoke, of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire (d. 1566), Hereditary King's Champion; Robert Dymoke, Dymock or Dymocke, of...

Another 69 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dimmack Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Dimmack family to immigrate North America: Thomas Dimmock who settled in Massachusetts in 1630; Martin Dimock settled in Virginia in 1637; William Dymocke arrived with his wife and servants in Barbados in 1679.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Pro Rege et lege Dimico
Motto Translation: Fight for King and Law.


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Dimmack Family Crest Products


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Dimmack Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  2. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  4. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  5. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Bolton's American Armory. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1964. Print.
  6. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  7. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  8. Fairbairn. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  9. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  10. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  11. ...

The Dimmack Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Dimmack Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 20 June 2016 at 12:57.

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