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Dewolf History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms


Origins Available: Dutch, English


Dewolf is a name whose history dates possibly as far back as 1066 when the Normans first arrived in Britain following their Conquest of the island. It was a name for a person who bore some fancied resemblance to the wolf, either in appearance or behavior.

Early Origins of the Dewolf family


The surname Dewolf was first found in Cheshire where they were descended from Hugh Lupus (Wolf,) the Earl of Chester, and chief subject of King William the Conqueror.

Early History of the Dewolf family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dewolf research.
Another 201 words (14 lines of text) covering the year 1202 is included under the topic Early Dewolf History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dewolf Spelling Variations


Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Dewolf have been found, including Wolfe, Wolf, Woolf, Woolfe, Wolff, de Wolfe and many more.

Early Notables of the Dewolf family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Dewolf Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Dewolf family to Ireland


Some of the Dewolf family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 105 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Dewolf family to the New World and Oceana


For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Dewolf were among those contributors:

Dewolf Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Balthasar DeWolf, who arrived in Hartford, Connecticut in 1656 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Dewolf Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Godvried DeWolf, who landed in New York in 1709 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Dewolf Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • N B DeWolf, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Contemporary Notables of the name Dewolf (post 1700)


  • Henry DeWolf (1898-1986), American physicist, diplomat, and bureaucrat
  • Jamie DeWolf (b. 1977), American slam poet and spoken word comedian
  • James Ratchford DeWolf (1787-1855), Canadian merchant and politician who represented Liverpool township from 1820 to 1830 and Queens County from 1830 to 1836 and from 1840 to 1843 in the Nova Scotia House of Assembly
  • Loran DeWolf (1754-1818), Canadian political figure in Nova Scotia
  • Benjamin DeWolf (1744-1819), Canadian businessman and political figure in Nova Scotia
  • Vice Admiral Henry George "Harry" DeWolf (1903-2000), Canadian naval officer
  • Elisha DeWolf (1756-1837), Canadian judge and political figure
  • Israel DeWolf Andrews (1813-1871), American politician, U.S. Consul in SAINT John, 1843-48; U.S. Special Diplomatic Agent to Canada, 1849-54; U.S. Consul General in Toronto, 1855-57 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, August 17) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • William DeWolf Hopper (1858-1935), American actor, singer, comedian, and theatrical producer

The Dewolf Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fides in adversis
Motto Translation: faith in adversity


Dewolf Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, August 17) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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