Danaher History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The history of the Danaher family begins among the Pictish clans ancient Scotland. The name Danaher comes from the personal name Dennis. Danaher is a patronymic surname, which belongs to the category of hereditary surnames. Some patronyms were formed from the personal names of the father of the bearer, while others came from prominent religious and secular figures. The surname Danaher was first established in Lancashire, prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

Early Origins of the Danaher family

The surname Danaher was first found in Stirlingshire at Denny, a town and parish. "This place, of which the name, derived from the Gaelic Dun, is descriptive of its situation on an eminence, originally formed part of the parish of Falkirk, from which it was separated about the year 1618. A considerable portion of the parish appears to have belonged to an establishment of Knights Templars which probably existed here or in the immediate vicinity, and the land is still known by the appellation of Temple-Denny. " [1]

Early History of the Danaher family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Danaher research. Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1400, 1424, 1634, 1676, 1501 and 1549 are included under the topic Early Danaher History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Danaher Spelling Variations

In the Middle ages, spelling and translation were not yet regulated by any general rules. spelling variations in names were common even among members of one family unit. Danaher has appeared Denny, Denney, Dennie, Denie, Denye, Deanney, Deannie and many more.

Early Notables of the Danaher family (pre 1700)

Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Danaher Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Danaher family to Ireland

Some of the Danaher family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 53 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Danaher migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Danaher Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • John Danaher, aged 25, who arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship "Nabob"
  • Denis Danaher, aged 12, who arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship "Utopia"
  • Edmund Danaher, aged 22, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship "Utopia"
  • John Danaher, aged 20, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship "Utopia"
  • Bridget Danaher, aged 16, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship "Utopia"
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Danaher migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Danaher Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Danaher, aged 38, a farm labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Hudson" in 1879

Contemporary Notables of the name Danaher (post 1700) +

  • Kevin Danaher, American author and anti-globalization activist
  • Kevin Danaher (1913-2002), Irish prominent folklorist, author of 10 books about Irish traditional customs and beliefs
  • De Clan Danaher (b. 1980), English rugby union footballer


The Danaher Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Et mea messis erit
Motto Translation: My harvest will also arrive.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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