Dall History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname is descended from a Norman noble who entered England in 1066 and was granted lands in England but was invited north by King David of Scotland about the year 1150, who granted him the lands of Dalyell. In Lanarkshire they were officially seated from the year 1259 on the lands of Dalyell meaning 'the beautiful meadow' on the banks of the River Clyde.

A word of explanation on the different spellings and pronunciations of this name is needed as its always been a source of confusion. The following ancient rhyme from Galloway (in South-West Scotland) perhaps indicates some of the early problems with the name: "Deil and Da'yell begins wi' ae letter, Deil's nae gude, and Da'yells nae better."

Early Origins of the Dall family

The surname Dall was first found in Lanarkshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Lannraig) a former county in the central Strathclyde region of Scotland, now divided into the Council Areas of North Lanarkshire, South Lanarkshire, and the City of Glasgow, where they were officially seated from the year 1259 on the lands of Dalyell meaning "the beautiful meadow" on the banks of the River Clyde. They are descended from a Norman noble who entered England in 1066 and was granted lands in England but was invited north by King David of Scotland about the year 1150, who granted him the lands of Dalyell. "It is said to have given name to the family upon whom the barony of Dalziel was bestowed by Kenneth II., in recompeuse of some exploit performed by them in the service of that monarch. " [1] Dalzell House, a historic house in Motherwell, North Lanarkshire was built by the Dalzell family in the 15th or early 16th century on lands they had held since the 13th century. Sir Robert Dalzell forfeited these same lands around 1342, for residing in England without the King's consent, but they were restored through marriage in the 15th century. The House is said to be haunted by three female ghosts all in different colored attire: green; white; and grey. The site was re-developed in the 1980s to be private apartments after falling into disrepair from the 1950s onwards.

Important Dates for the Dall family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dall research. Another 260 words (19 lines of text) covering the years 1633, 1649, 1835, 1941, 1550, 1636, 1628, 1615, 1685, 1639, 1686, 1689, 1687, 1737, 1689, 1702, 1662, 1715 and are included under the topic Early Dall History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dall Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Dalyell, Dalyiel, Dalzell, Dalziel, Dallyell, Daleel, Dalliel, Dalzel and many more.

Early Notables of the Dall family (pre 1700)

Notable among the family at this time was Robert Dalzell (1550-1636), English 1st Lord Dalzell, created a Lord in 1628, by King Charles I of England; General Tam (Thomas) Dalyell (1615-1685), a Scottish Royalist General in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms; Sir Robert Dalzell, 1st Baronet (1639-1686), a Scottish politician; Sir John...
Another 53 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dall Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Dall family to Ireland

Some of the Dall family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 58 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dall migration to the United States

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Dall Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Conrad Dall, who arrived in America in 1753 [2]
  • William Dall, who landed in America in 1753 [2]
  • John Peter Dall, who landed in Frederick County, Maryland in 1796 [2]
Dall Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Edward Dall, aged 22, who landed in Missouri in 1848 [2]
  • J H Dall, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850 [2]
  • Andreas Peter Dall, who landed in New York, NY in 1850 [2]
  • W Dall, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851 [2]

Dall migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Dall Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Dall, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Slains Castle" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 9th November 1852 [3]
  • Mrs. Dall, British settler with 5 children travelling from London aboard the ship "Slains Castle" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 9th November 1852 [3]
  • Agnes Dall, aged 23, a servant, who arrived in Otago aboard the ship "Rimutaka" in 1885

Contemporary Notables of the name Dall (post 1700)

  • William Healey Dall (1845-1927), American naturalist, a prominent malacologist, known as one of the earliest explorers of interior Alaska, eponym of Dall Island and Dall Lake, Alaska
  • John Dall (1920-1971), born John Dall Thompson, an American Academy Award nominated actor
  • Curtis Bean Dall (1896-1991), American stockbroker, Vice-Presidential candidate, author, and the first husband of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
  • Cynthia Dall (1971-2012), born Cynthia Meggin Loya, sometimes known as "Cindy Dall", an American musician and photographer
  • Bobby Dall (b. 1963), born Robert Harry Kuykendall, an American musician best known as the bassist for the multi-platinum selling hard rock band Poison
  • Karl Bernhard Dall (b. 1941), German comedian, singer and television presenter
  • James Kyle Dall (b. 1845), English first headmaster of Elmfield College, Heworth, York

Historic Events for the Dall family

HMS Hood
  • Mr. Francis O Dall (b. 1922), Scottish Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [4]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Frank O'N. Dall, British Boy 1st Class with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he survived the sinking [5]

Citations

  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  4. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  5. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html
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