Dalglish History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The rugged west coast of Scotland in the kingdom of Dalriada is the setting from which came the Dalglish name. The name derives from someone having lived in the ancient lands of Dalgleish on Tinna Water, in the Parish of Ettrick, in the county of Selkirk, Scotland. The place name comes from the Celtic dol, meaning "field," and glas, or "green."

Early Origins of the Dalglish family

The surname Dalglish was first found in Selkirkshire (Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Shalcraig), where the name Dalgleish had its roots in the lands of Dalgleish on Tinna Water, in the Parish of Ettrick, Selkirkshire, in Scotland. The Dalgleish family figured prominently in the Scottish-English border conflicts.

Early History of the Dalglish family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dalglish research. Another 139 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1452, 1590, 1597, 1560, 1591, 1560, 1582, 1582 and 1586 are included under the topic Early Dalglish History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dalglish Spelling Variations

In various documents Dalglish has been spelled Since medieval scribes still spelled according to sound, records from that era contain an enormous number of spelling variations. Dalgleish, Dalgliesh, Dalglish, Dalglese, Dagleish, Dagleishe, Dalgleise, Dalgleiss, Dalgiss, Dalgis, Dalglis and many more.

Early Notables of the Dalglish family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the Clan from early times was Sir William Dalgles; and Nicol Dalgleish (c.,1560 - ?), Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1591. Nicol was born about 1560. His brother was a merchant in Inverness so he may have originated in, or had connections with that city. He is mentioned as having been a Regent (or teacher) in St Leonard's College in the University of St Andrews, so...
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dalglish Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Dalglish migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Dalglish Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Dalglish, British settler travelling from London, UK aboard the ship "Bosworth" arriving in Dunedin, South Island, New Zealand on 24th November 1857 [1]
  • Mrs. Dalglish, British settler travelling from London, UK aboard the ship "Bosworth" arriving in Dunedin, South Island, New Zealand on 24th November 1857 [1]

Contemporary Notables of the name Dalglish (post 1700) +

  • Malcolm Dalglish (b. 1952), American hammered dulcimer player and builder, composer, and choral director
  • James B. Dalglish, American fighter pilot and flying ace in the U.S. Army Air Forces, during World War II, credited with 6 aerial victories
  • Sir Kenneth Mathieson Dalglish M.B.E. (b. 1951), born in Glasgow, Scotland, Scottish former football player and manager, was appointed a Knight Bachelor on 8th June 2018 and Member of the Order of the British Empire in 1985 New Years Honours, for Charity and to the City of Liverpool [2]
  • Rear Admiral Robin Dalglish (1880-1934), British Royal Navy officer


The Dalglish Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Deliciae meae
Motto Translation: My delight.


  1. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  2. ^ "Birthday and New Year Honours Lists (1940 to 2019)." Issue 62310, 4 July 2019 | London Gazette, The Gazette, June 2018, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/62310/supplement/B1


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