Croux History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancestors of the bearers of the Croux family name are thought have lived in ancient Anglo-Saxon England. They were first found as dwellers at a cattle-pen or cattle-fold. [1]

Early Origins of the Croux family

The surname Croux was first found in Cheshire where the "ancestors of Lord Crewe were Lords of Crewe, co. Chester, 13 Edward I." (during the thirteenth year of King Edward I's reign.) [2]

Today, Crewe is a township, in the parish of Barthomley, union and hundred of Nantwich in Cheshire. "It has been the inheritance of the Crewe family from a very early period. The Hall, the seat of Lord Crewe, exhibits a good specimen of the more enriched style of architecture which prevailed in the early part of the 17th century: it was begun in 1615, and completed in 1636, and the ceilings and wainscots of many of the rooms, and the principal staircase, retain their original decorations. The gallery, a hundred feet in length, is fitted up as a library, and contains a number of family portraits, and fine pictures: the mansion has also a private chapel, where divine service is performed every Sunday morning, and where is a large painting of the Last Supper, with two beautiful specimens of ancient stained glass. " [3]

Looking back further researchers found the name actually dates back to Norman times as "Crewe was in the barony of Malbanc, and was possessed c. 1150 by Henry de Criwa, who attested a charter of Hugh Malbanc. Sire Thomas de Crue was living after 1241. Hence the Lords Crewe of Stene, maternally represented by the Lords Crewe." [4]

Early History of the Croux family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Croux research. Another 175 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1565, 1634, 1558, 1646, 1565, 1634, 1623, 1625, 1598, 1679, 1624, 1697, 1656, 1633, 1721, 1671, 1674, 1674 and 1721 are included under the topic Early Croux History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Croux Spelling Variations

Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Croux include Crewe, Crew, Croux, Crewes, Creuse and others.

Early Notables of the Croux family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Randulphe or Randolph Crew or Crewe (1558-1646), English judge, second son of John Crew of Nantwich, who is said to have been a tanner; Sir Thomas Crewe (or Crew) (1565-1634), of Stene in Northamptonshire, an English Member of Parliament and lawyer, Speaker of the...
Another 53 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Croux Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Croux family

Searching for a better life, many English families migrated to British colonies. Unfortunately, the majority of them traveled under extremely harsh conditions: overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the ocean. For those families that arrived safely, modest prosperity was attainable, and many went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the new colonies. Research into the origins of individual families in North America revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Croux or a variant listed above: Randall Crew who settled in Virginia in 1621; John Crewe was farming in Virginia in 1642; followed by Thomas Crew in 1652; William Crew settled in Barbados in 1660.



The Croux Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sequor nec inferior
Motto Translation: I follow, but am not inferior.


  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)


Houseofnames.com on Facebook