Crawshaw History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The roots of the Anglo-Saxon name Crawshaw come from when the family resided in the village of Cranshaw (Cronkshaw) in Lancashire. The name is derived from the Old English "cran(uc)" which means "crane" + "sceaga" which means "grove" or "thicket." [1] Another source claims the name literally means "the twisting or winding shaw (wood.)" [2]

Early Origins of the Crawshaw family

The surname Crawshaw was first found in Lancashire at Cranshaw (Cronkshaw) in the parish of Rochdale or Bury. One of the first records of the name was William de Crounkeshawe who was listed there in 1412. [3]

Cranshaws Castle or Cranshaws Tower is a 15th-century pele near the village of Cranshaws in Berwickshire, Scotland. The castle is thought to be the inspiration for "Ravenswood Castle", home of Edgar, the hero of Sir Walter Scott's tragedy the Bride of Lammermoor.

Early History of the Crawshaw family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Crawshaw research. Another 116 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1590, 1572, 1626, 1610, 1667, 1612 and 1649 are included under the topic Early Crawshaw History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Crawshaw Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore,spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Crawshaw has been recorded under many different variations, including Crawshaw, Crawshay, Crawshawe, Cranshaw, Crankshaw and many more.

Early Notables of the Crawshaw family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include William Crashaw (1572-1626), English Puritan divine and poet, son of Richard Crashaw of Handsworth, near Sheffield, Yorkshire. Major Joseph Croshaw (1610-1667), son of Captain Raleigh Croshaw, was a substantial planter living near Williamsburg in the US Colony and Dominion...
Another 44 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Crawshaw Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Crawshaw migration to the United States +

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Crawshaw or a variant listed above:

Crawshaw Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Raleigh Crawshaw, who landed in Virginia in 1608 [4]
  • Rawleigh Crawshaw, who arrived in Virginia in 1620 [4]
  • William Crawshaw, who settled in Virginia in 1624
Crawshaw Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James, Titus, and William Crawshaw, who settled in Philadelphia in the 1860's

Australia Crawshaw migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Crawshaw Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Crawshaw, English convict who was convicted in Lancaster, Lancashire, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Dromedary" on 11th September 1819, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [5]
  • Miss Rosannah Crawshaw, (b. 1813), aged 19, English nursery maid who was convicted in Lancaster, Lancashire, England for 7 years for robbery, transported aboard the "Fanny" on 14th July 1832, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [6]
  • Miss Crawshaw, (b. 1831), aged 1, English settler traveling with convict Miss Rosannah Crawshaw, transported aboard the "Fanny" on 14th July 1832, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [6]
  • Mr. Thomas Crawshaw, British Convict who was convicted in Preston, Lancashire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asiatic" on 26th May 1843, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [7]

New Zealand Crawshaw migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Crawshaw Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Crawshaw (Crawshay), British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Katherine Stewart Forbes" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th March 1852 [8]
  • John Crawshaw, aged 21, a blacksmith, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Oliver Lang" in 1856
  • James Crawshaw, aged 29, a labourer, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Resolute" in 1865

Contemporary Notables of the name Crawshaw (post 1700) +

  • Raymond "Ray" Crawshaw (1908-1937), English professional footballer
  • Richard Leigh "Dick" Crawshaw (1898-1965), English professional footballer who played from 1919 to 1931
  • Thomas Henry "Tommy" Crawshaw (1872-1960), English professional footballer who was on the England National Team ten times from 1895 to 1904
  • Robert Arnold Crawshaw (1869-1952), British gold medalist water polo player and swimmer at the 1900 Summer Olympics
  • Richard Crawshaw OBE (1917-1986), Baron Crawshaw of Aintree, British Labour Party Member of Parliament in 1964
  • John Crawshaw Raynes (1887-1929), English recipient of the Victoria Cross


  1. ^ Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  5. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 16th July 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/dromedary
  6. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 29th September 2022). https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/fanny
  7. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 14th July 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/asiatic
  8. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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