Craddock History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The origins of the ancient name Craddock belong to that rich Celtic tradition that comes from Wales. This surname was derived from the Welsh personal name Caradoc, meaning "amiable." Other forms of this ancient forename are Caradawc, Cradawc, and Caradog. This name was made famous by the ancient Welsh military leader Caratacos, whose name was Latinized as Caratacus. He was celebrated for his opposition to the Roman occupation of Britain, and was taken to Rome as a prisoner circa 51 AD.

Early Origins of the Craddock family

The surname Craddock was first found in Glamorganshire (Welsh: Sir Forgannwg), a region of South Wales, anciently part of the Welsh kingdom of Glywysing. However, some of the family were found in Whaston (Washton) in the North Riding of Yorkshire in early times. "It comprises about 1200 acres, partly the property of the Craddock family." [1]

Over in Monmouthshire, the parish of Portskuett held an early entry for the family. "The name, originally Porthis-Coed, signifies 'the port below the wood;' and, according to tradition, here was the port or landing-place for Venta Siluram, now Caerwent. A magnificent palace was built at this spot by Harold, son of Earl Godwin, who entertained Edward the Confessor within its walls; but shortly afterwards, Caradoc ab Grufydd, a Welsh chieftain, having a pique against Harold, razed the palace, and carried away the materials." [1]

Carodag (d. 1035), was a South Welsh prince, a son of Rhydderch, who had seized the government of Deheubarth, and died in 1031 at the hands of Irish pirates. [2]

Caradog ap Gruffydd (died 1081) was a Prince of Gwent in south-east Wales, grandson of Rhydderch ab Iestyn (died 1033), king of Gwent and Morgannwg. Caradog ap Gruffydd was killed at the Battle of Mynydd Carn.

Caradog of Llancarvan (d. 1147?), was a Welsh ecclesiastic and chronicler, was, as his name indicates, probably either born at or a monk of the famous abbey of Llancarvan in the vale of Glamorgan. [2]

Early History of the Craddock family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Craddock research. Another 178 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1603, 1604, 1619, 1836, 1512, 1516, 1606, 1659, 1638, 1636, 1621, 1615, 1641, 1628, 1629, 1660, 1716, 1797, 1708, 1778 and 1708 are included under the topic Early Craddock History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Craddock Spelling Variations

Although there are comparatively few Welsh surnames, they have a great many spelling variations. Variations of Welsh names began almost immediately after their acceptance within Welsh society. In the Middle Ages, it was up to priests and the few other people that recorded names in official documents to decide how to spell the names that they heard. Variations that occurred because of improper recording increased dramatically as the names were later transliterated into English. The Brythonic Celtic language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, featured many highly inflected sounds that could not be properly captured by the English language. Spelling variations were, however, also carried out according to an individual's design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations were all indicated by the particular variation of one's name. The spelling variations of the name Craddock have included Craddock, Caradoc, Cradoc, Craddoch, Cradoch, Cradock, Caradoch, Carradock, Carradoch, Caradock and many more.

Early Notables of the Craddock family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was William Cradock, Archdeacon of Lewes from 1512 to 1516; Walter Cradock or Craddock or Cradoc (c.1606-1659), a Welsh Anglican clergyman, became a traveling evangelical preacher, founder of the first Independent church in Wales (1638); Matthew Cradock (died 1636), an English wool...
Another 51 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Craddock Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Craddock family to Ireland

Some of the Craddock family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 85 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Craddock migration to the United States +

Many Welsh joined the great migrations to North America in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Like their Scottish and Irish neighbors, many Welsh families left their homeland hoping to find hope and prosperity in a land that the English did not exercise a tight rule over. Those Welsh immigrants that successfully traveled to North America went on to make significant contributions to the rapid development of both Canada and the United States in terms of the settling of land and the establishment of industry. They also added to the rich cultural heritage of both countries. An examination into the immigration and passenger lists has discovered a number of people bearing the name Craddock:

Craddock Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Isabel] Craddock, aged 30, who arrived in New England in 1635 [3]
  • Isabell Craddock, aged 30, who landed in America in 1635 [3]
  • Matthew Craddock who became the Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony about 1650
Craddock Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Sam] Craddock, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [3]
  • Walter Craddock, who arrived in Virginia in 1719 [3]
  • the Rev. Thomas Craddock, who settled in Maryland from Bedfordshire, England in the year 1744
Craddock Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Craddock, aged 29, who landed in New York in 1864 [3]
  • Mary A Craddock, aged 25, who arrived in New York in 1864 [3]
  • A.L. Craddock, aged 21, who landed in America from Stroud, in 1897
Craddock Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Annie Craddock, aged 25, who settled in America from Ballinasloe, in 1900
  • Arthur Craddock, aged 24, who landed in America from Bedford, in 1903
  • Arthur Craddock, aged 22, who immigrated to the United States from Coventry, in 1904
  • Arthur Renfro Craddock, aged 27, who settled in America from London, in 1904
  • Eugenia Craddock, aged 23, who settled in America, in 1904
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Craddock migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Craddock Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Craddock U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783 [4]

Australia Craddock migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Craddock Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Daniel Craddock, English convict from Kent, who was transported aboard the "Adelaide" on April 16, 1855, settling in Western Australia [5]
  • Abraham Craddock, aged 21, who arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship "Confiance" [6]

New Zealand Craddock migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Craddock Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Michael Craddock, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Nourmahal" arriving in Dunedin, Otaga, South Island, New Zealand on 5th May 1858 [7]
  • Mrs. Craddock, British settler travelling from London with 3 sons aboard the ship "Nourmahal" arriving in Dunedin, Otaga, South Island, New Zealand on 5th May 1858 [7]
  • Miss Craddock, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Nourmahal" arriving in Dunedin, Otaga, South Island, New Zealand on 5th May 1858 [7]
  • Mrs. Maria Craddock, (b. 1841), aged 21, Cornish settler departing on 5th August 1862 aboard the ship "Chrysolite" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th November 1862 [8]
  • Mr. William Craddock, (b. 1839), aged 23, Cornish farm labourer departing on 5th August 1862 aboard the ship "Chrysolite" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th November 1862 [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Craddock (post 1700) +

  • William Henry Craddock (1851-1904), American Democrat politician, Mayor of Kansas City, Kansas, 1901-03; Candidate for Governor of Kansas, 1902 [9]
  • W. E. Craddock, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1916 [9]
  • W. B. Craddock, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1872 [9]
  • John Durrett Craddock (1881-1942), American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1924; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 4th District, 1929-31; Defeated, 1930 [9]
  • Nathan Thomas Craddock, American Libertarian politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from California 33rd District, 2000 [9]
  • Joe N. Craddock, American Democrat politician, Mayor of Clarksburg, West Virginia, 1919 [9]
  • Granville Craddock (b. 1863), American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1912 [9]
  • D. J. Craddock, American Republican politician, Chair of Putnam County Republican Party, 1969 [9]
  • George W. Craddock, American politician, Secretary of State of Kentucky, 1872-75 [9]
  • Charles Craddock, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1912 [9]
  • ... (Another 23 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Repulse
  • Mr. William Alfred Craddock, British Stoker 1st Class, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [10]


The Craddock Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nec temere, nec timide
Motto Translation: Neither rashly nor timidly.


Suggested Readings for the name Craddock +

  • 3667 "Sketches and Genealogy of the Bailey-Craddock-Lawson Families of Virginia and North Carolina" by Betsy Lawson Willis.

  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  5. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 17) Adelaide voyage to Western Australia, Australia in 1855 with 261 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/adelaide/1855
  6. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 30th November 1858. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Confiance 1858. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/confiance1858.shtml.
  7. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  8. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Lyttelton 1858-84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  9. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 27) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  10. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html


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