Cordrey History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Today's generation of the Cordrey family bears a name that was brought to England by the migration wave that was started by the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Cordrey family lived in Berkshire. The name, however, refers to the area of Cordray, in Eure, Normandy, where the family lived prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. "Benedict de Coudray was witness to a charter of Roger de Menilwarin to Deulacresse Abbey (Mon. ii.) and Fulco de Coudray held one fee from Abingdon Abbey." [1]

Early Origins of the Cordrey family

The surname Cordrey was first found in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 where John de Coudray (no county) was listed. A few years later, the Writs of Parliament listed William de Coudraye, 1307. [2]

Important Dates for the Cordrey family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cordrey research. Another 100 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1618, 1619, 1588, 1664, 1616, 1684, 1616, 1600, 1577 and 1590 are included under the topic Early Cordrey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cordrey Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, Norman French and other languages became incorporated into English throughout the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Cordrey include Cowdrey, Cowdray, Cowderey, Cowderoy, Corderoy, Cordroy, Cowdroy, Cowdry, Cowdery and many more.

Early Notables of the Cordrey family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Abbott Monsire Cowdrey; and Daniel Cawdry (Cawdrey) (1588-1664), an English clergyman, member of the Westminster Assembly. He was the youngest son of Robert Cawdry. [3] Zachary Cawdry (1616-1684), author of the ‘Discourse of Patronage,’ was born in 1616 at Melton Mowbray, of which town his father, also called Zachary, was vicar. [3] Jeremy Corderory ( fl. 1600), was an English...
Another 65 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cordrey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cordrey migration to the United States

In England at this time, the uncertainty of the political and religious environment of the time caused many families to board ships for distant British colonies in the hopes of finding land and opportunity, and escaping persecution. The voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, though, and many arrived in North America sick, starved, and destitute. Those who did make it, however, were greeted with greater opportunities and freedoms that they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Early immigration records have shown some of the first Cordreys to arrive on North American shores:

Cordrey Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Thomas H. Cordrey, aged 45, originally from Bootle, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Royal George" from Liverpool, England [4]

Cordrey migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Cordrey Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • George Cordrey, aged 23, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Ballochmyle" in 1874

Citations

  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6QK-F6T : 6 December 2014), Thos H. Cordrey, 23 Feb 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Royal George, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
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