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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The ancestors of the Constapple family migrated to England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The surname Constapple is for a law enforcement officer of a parish. The surname is derived from the Old French word, cunestable.

Constapple Early Origins



The surname Constapple was first found in Yorkshire where the family descend from Robert de Laci, whose ancestors had been constables of Chester under the celebrated Hugh Lupus temp. William the Conqueror. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Jordan Constabul in Northumberland; and Clemens le Constable in Kent. The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 list: Margareta Constabille and Richard Constabularius. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
The parish of Melton-Constable is of great significance to the family. "This place is of great antiquity, and at the time of the Domesday Survey was granted to the bishops of Thetford, of whom it was held by Roger de Lyons, whose descendants assumed the name of Constable, from the office which they held under the see." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Wassand in the East Riding of Yorkshire was home to another branch of the family. " It is called in Domesday Book Wadsande, and after passing through the abbeys of Meaux and of St. Mary at York, and several families, came, in the time of Henry VIII., to the Constables, by whom it is still possessed." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Again, in the East Riding of Yorkshire, we found another early reference at Benningholme. " Among the chief owners of land in former times were the Constables, who had possessions in the township so early as the time of Henry III.: several of the farmhouses contain ancient remains." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Constapple Spelling Variations


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Constapple Spelling Variations



Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Constapple family name include Constable, Constables and others.

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Constapple Early History


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Constapple Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Constapple research. Another 383 words (27 lines of text) covering the years 1150, 1390, 1443, 1518, 1478, 1537, 1590, 1655, 1562, 1613, 1592, 1647, 1595, 1664, 1651, 1710, 1682 and 1746 are included under the topic Early Constapple History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Constapple Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Constapple Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Marmaduke Constable (1443-1518), English soldier; Sir Robert Constable ( c. 1478-1537) of Flamborough, Sheriff of Yorkshire, executed for treason for taking part in the Pilgrimage of Grace; Sir William Constable, 1st Baronet (baptized 1590-1655), English...

Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Constapple Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Constapple family to immigrate North America: Robert Constable who settled in Virginia in 1624; Sarah Constable settled in Virginia in 1656; Thomas Constable and his sister Blanche arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1683.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Semper paratus
Motto Translation: Always prepared.


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Constapple Family Crest Products


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Constapple Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  2. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  3. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  4. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  5. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  6. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  7. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  8. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  9. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  10. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  11. ...

The Constapple Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Constapple Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 16 March 2016 at 13:47.

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