Cocker History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Cocker was carried to England in the enormous movement of people that followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Cocker family lived in Norfolk. The family was originally from Cochett in Calvados, Normandy, and it is from their residence in this location that the name derives.

Early Origins of the Cocker family

The surname Cocker was first found in Norfolk where they held a family seat from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Important Dates for the Cocker family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cocker research. Another 98 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1631 and 1676 are included under the topic Early Cocker History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cocker Spelling Variations

Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English linguistic stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often referred to by different spellings in different documents. The name has been spelled Cocket, Cockett and others.

Early Notables of the Cocker family (pre 1700)

Another 37 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cocker Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cocker migration to the United States

To escape the political and religious persecution within England at the time, many English families left for the various British colonies abroad. The voyage was extremely difficult, though, and the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving. But for those who made it, the trip was most often worth it. Many of the families who arrived went on to make valuable contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families reveals a number of immigrants bearing the name Cocker or a variant listed above:

Cocker Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • William Cocker, who landed in Virginia in 1637 [1]
  • Lancett Cocker, who arrived in Virginia in 1652 [1]
  • Thomas Cocker, who landed in Maryland in 1666 [1]
  • John Cocker, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1686 [1]
  • Jonathan Cocker, who landed in Virginia in 1696 [1]
Cocker Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James Cocker, aged 21, who landed in America in 1821 [1]
  • William Cocker, who arrived in Texas in 1859 [1]

Cocker migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Cocker Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • William Cocker, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rajasthan" in 1838 [2]
  • Sarah Cocker, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rajasthan" in 1838 [2]
  • Harriet Cocker, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Hooghly" in 1846 [3]
  • John Cocker, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Hooghly" in 1846 [3]
  • Mary Cocker, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Hooghly" in 1846 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Cocker migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Cocker Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Miss Ann Cocker, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Victory " arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 17th October 1863 [4]

Contemporary Notables of the name Cocker (post 1700)

  • John Robert "Joe" Cocker OBE (1944-2014), English rock and blues singer, probably best known for his 1983 Grammy Award winning No. 1 hit "Up Where We Belong" and his cover of "With a Little Help from My Friends" performed at Woodstock
  • Chester Arthur Cocker (b. 1941), American statesman
  • Mac Cocker (d. 2016), English-born Australian radio announcer for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation
  • Norman Cocker (1889-1953), English organist and composer for organ
  • Les Cocker (1924-1979), English professional football player and a coach
  • John Cocker (1815-1885), English-born, Australian cricketer, known for his appearance against England in 1842
  • Linzey Louise Cocker (b. 1987), English actress best known for her role as Jade Webb in the BBC Three comedy-drama series Drop Dead Gorgeous
  • Mark Cocker (b. 1959), English author and naturalist, known for his writings in The Guardian, The Daily Telegraph, The Times and The Independent
  • Jarvis Branson Cocker (b. 1963), English musician and frontman for the band Pulp
  • David J. Cocker (b. 1955), New Zealand fencer at the 1984 Summer Olympics
  • ... (Another 1 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Citations

  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) RAJASTHAN 1838. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1838Rajasthan.htm
  3. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) HOOGHLY 1846. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1846Hooghly.htm
  4. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
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