Claptaen History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Claptaen surname finds its earliest origins with the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. Their name is derived from Osgoode Clapa a nobleman of Danish or Saxon origin. As a man of noble worth he attended the Court of King Cnut. Another possible origin of the surname Claptaen may be an extension of the Old English Clop which meant lump. It was often applied as a nickname to someone who was large and ungainly. It was adopted in England as a surname only after the Norman Conquest of 1066.

Early Origins of the Claptaen family

The surname Claptaen was first found in Cheshire where they held a family seat. The name is claimed to be descended from a Danish noble who attended the court of King Canute, Osgod Clappa. Although the name was found in the late 13th century in Oxford, the Cheshire dating places Turstan de Cloptuna there in the year 1154, and succeeded by Alan de Clapeton in 1185. In its migration south, the name seems to have been transformed into Clopton, which gave rise to the village of Clopton in Suffolk, which became the family seat. There is much historic interchangeability between the records of the two spellings.

The church in the village of Long Melford, Suffolk "contains many interesting monuments, among which are, one to William de Clopton, dated 1446; one to John de Clopton in 1497 and numerous brasses to the families of Clopton." [1]

Important Dates for the Claptaen family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Claptaen research. Another 173 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1275, 1441, 1455, 1487, 1389, 1483, 1501, 1614, 1662, 1733, 1412, 1359, 1366, 1388, 1400, 1440, 1496, 1491, 1497, 1450 and 1474 are included under the topic Early Claptaen History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Claptaen Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Claptaen are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Claptaen include: Clapton, Clappton, Clopton, Clapeton, Cloptun, Cloptone, Clotton, Clapperton and many more.

Early Notables of the Claptaen family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Walter de Clopton (d. 1412?), an English judge, the fourth son of Sir William de Clopton of Newnham Manor, Ashdon, Essex. "The seat of the family was Suffolk, and Sir William de Clopton appears as commissioner of array for that county in 1359. Having, however, purchased Newnham Manor in the following year, he permanently established himself there, and it remained in his posterity for some generations. For some reason, which the writ does not disclose, he and his sons Walter and Edmund were enjoined in 1366 not to leave the country on pain of forfeiture...
Another 117 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Claptaen Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Claptaen family

Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Claptaen or a variant listed above: William Clopton, who settled in Virginia in 1698; John Clapton, a bonded passenger who arrived in Maryland in 1737; Robt. Clapton, who arrived at the port of New York in 1830.

Citations

  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
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