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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


From the historical and enchanting region of Normandy emerged a multitude of noble families, including the distinguished Carbine family. Originally, the Norman people were known only by a single name. Surnames evolved during the Middle Ages when people began to assume an extra name to avoid confusion and to further identify themselves. Often they adopted names that were derived from nicknames. Nickname surnames were derived from an eke-name, or added name. They usually reflected the physical characteristics or attributes of the first person that used the name. The name Carbine is a nickname type of surname for a person with dark hair. Tracing the origin of the name further, we found the name Carbine was originally derived from the Old French word "corbeau," which means "raven."

Carbine Early Origins



The surname Carbine was first found in Shropshire, where they claim descendancy from Roger, son of Corbet as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. Roger le Corbet (or Fitz Corbet) was granted several manors by William the Conqueror as the Barony of Caus for his role in the Conquest. "The first Corbet came from Shropshire and settled in Teviotdale under Earl David in the first quarter of the twelfth century." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

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Carbine Spelling Variations


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Carbine Spelling Variations



Spelling variations of this family name include: Corbett, Corbet, Corbetts, Corbit, Corbitt, Corbitts and many more.

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Carbine Early History


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Carbine Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Carbine research. Another 287 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1124, 1241, 1296, 1580, 1637, 1624, 1600, 1582, 1635, 1594, 1662, 1646, 1648, 1595, 1662, 1617, 1657, 1640, 1640, 1683, 1677, 1683, 1658, 1675, 1748, 1705 and 1711 are included under the topic Early Carbine History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Carbine Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Carbine Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notable among the family at this time was Sir Robert Corbett of Selkirk Abbey; Sir Andrew Corbet (1580-1637), an English politician, Member of Parliament for Shropshire (1624-25), matriculated at Queen's College, Oxford (1600); Richard Corbet (1582-1635) poet and prelate; Sir John Corbet, 1st Baronet of Stoke upon Tern (1594-1662), an English...

Another 102 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Carbine Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Carbine In Ireland


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Carbine In Ireland



Some of the Carbine family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 101 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: Alexander Corbet who sailed on the Lucy to Canada and settled in PEI in 1790; Ann Corbet who with her husband Allan MacDonald, settled in Antigonish, N.S. in 1829.

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Contemporary Notables of the name Carbine (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Carbine (post 1700)



  • John D. Carbine, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1952 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 23) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • J. Fred Carbine Jr., American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1972 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 23) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Deus pascit corvos
Motto Translation: God feeds the ravens.


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Carbine Family Crest Products


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Carbine Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 23) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

Other References

  1. Dorward, David. Scottish Surnames. Glasgow: Harper Collins, 1995. Print.
  2. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Adam, Frank. Clans Septs and Regiments of the Scottish Highlands 8th Edition. London: Bacon (G.W.) & Co, 1970. Print. (ISBN 10-0717945006).
  4. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  5. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  6. Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3).
  7. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Scots Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Mordern Application of the Art and Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
  8. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and Don Pottinger. Clan Map Scotland of Old. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1983. Print.
  9. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  10. Catholic Directory For Scotland. Glasgow: Burns Publications. Print.
  11. ...

The Carbine Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Carbine Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 23 October 2015 at 10:25.

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