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Brittany History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Brittany is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The Brittany family lived in Essex. The name is a reference to the French province of Brettagne or Brittany. Families from this area largely consisted of the descendants of Celtic tribes who were originally forced to flee ancient Britain from the Roman Tyrant, Maximus, around 384 AD, and settled across the Channel. When the Romans left, the settlement remained, and carries the name to this day. From about 950 onwards, the Dukes of Brittany became closely related to the Dukes of Normandy, and even accompanied them at Hastings in 1066. Many of the Brettagne families who were granted land by William, Duke of Normandy had come in a complete circle, settling again on their former homeland in Powys, on the English- Welsh border.

Early Origins of the Brittany family


The surname Brittany was first found in Essex where they had been granted lands by King William for their assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

"The manor of Kenardington [in Kent] formed a portion of the lands assigned by William the Conqueror for the defence of Dover Castle, and came by marriage in the reign of George I. to the Breton family, with whom it has since remained. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

The name occurred many times throughout the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273: John de Brytaygn in Cambridgeshire; Giffard le Bretun in Buckinghamshire; Hugo le Bretun in Suffolk and more. The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Alicia de Britten; Elias de Britton; and Ricardus Britton. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

Early records of Warwickshire found the family in the hamlet of Marston. "This place, anciently called Breton's Mannour, was held by Guido Breton in the reign of Henry IV.; the manor has since gone with that of Wolstan." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Brittany family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Brittany research.
Another 375 words (27 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1164, 1273, 1273, 1296, 1275, 1545 and 1626 are included under the topic Early Brittany History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Brittany Spelling Variations


Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Brittany family name include Breton, Britain, Britayne, Briton, Brittain, Brittaine, Brittan, Britten, Brittenie, Brittin, Britting, Britton, Brittone, Brettain, Bretaine, Bretayne, Brettin, Bretin, Brettan, Brettinie, Brettony, Brittany, Brettany, Britteny, Brittiny and many more.

Early Notables of the Brittany family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John de Breton (died 1275), medieval Bishop of Hereford, royal justice and sheriff, generally attributed to the term "Britton," the...
Another 27 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Brittany Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Brittany family to Ireland


Some of the Brittany family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 98 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Brittany family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Brittany family to immigrate North America: Widow Breton and son who settled in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1732; J. Breton settled in New Orleans in 1820; Elizabeth Breton settled in New York in 1820.

Contemporary Notables of the name Brittany (post 1700)


  • Morgan Brittany, actress
  • Brittany Furlan (b. 1986), American comedian and internet personality
  • Brittany Chung, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 2004 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 25) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Brittany Zelmer, Canadian curler at the 2011 Shoot-Out and the 2013 Avonair Cash Spiel
  • Brittany Binger (b. 1987), American model and television personality
  • Brittany Droddy, American actress, known for her work on Machete (2010), Triangle: Remembering the Fire (2011), The Association (2012) and the Second Impression (2014)
  • Brittany Anne Pirtle (b. 1989), American actress, known for her work in Power Rangers Samurai (2011), Power Rangers Samurai: A New Enemy (vol. 2) (2012) and Power Rangers Samurai (2011)
  • Brittany Anne Snow (b. 1986), American Young Artist Award and three-time Teen Choice Award nominated television and film actress and singer
  • Brittany Renee Finamore, American actress, known for her work in Things Behind the Sun (2001), Forget Me Not (2009) and Pulse 3 (2008)
  • Brittany Reimer, Canadian silver and two-time bronze medalist long-distance swimmer from Victoria, British Columbia

The Brittany Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cassis tutissima virtus
Motto Translation: Virtue is the safest helmet.


Brittany Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 25) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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