Bloor History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The founding heritage of the Bloor family is in the Anglo-Saxon culture that once dominated in Britain. The name Bloor comes from when one of the family worked as a blower, or one who plays the horn. [1]

Early Origins of the Bloor family

The surname Bloor was first found in Staffordshire at Bloore-in-Tyrley or Blore Heath, a sparsely populated area of farmland best known as the site of the first major battle in the English Wars of the Roses fought on 23 September 1459. [2]

This parish in the north division of the hundred of Totmonslow, which was known as Blore or Blore-Roy dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was recorded as Blora [3] and literally meant "place at the swelling or hill." [4]

Early English rolls provide us a glimpse of the spelling variations used through Medieval times. Today we typically need to look beyond the spellings of these entries and concentrate on a phonetic appreciation of the names. Randulf Bla was listed in the Assize Rolls for Lincolnshire in 1202 and later in Huntingdonshire, Roger Blowe was listed there in 1271. Up in Yorkshire, the Subsidy Rolls of 1327 included an entry for Thomas Blaue. [5]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 included the following entries for the family: Henry Blowe, Cambridgeshire; Isabella Blowe, Oxfordshire; and William Blowe, Oxfordshire. [1]

In Somerset, there was one entry, 1 Edward III (during the first year of the reign of King Edward III), that of John Blowe. [6]

Early History of the Bloor family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Bloor research. Another 303 words (22 lines of text) covering the years 1459, 1574, 1575, 1574, 1618, 1640, 1548, 1761, 1639, 1649, 1708, 1669, 1648, 1701 and 1662 are included under the topic Early Bloor History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bloor Spelling Variations

The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardize the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it. Bloor has been spelled many different ways, including Bloor, Blore, Bloare, Bloore, Blour, Bloure and others.

Early Notables of the Bloor family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include John Blow (1649-1708), an English Baroque composer and organist, appointed to Westminster Abbey in 1669. He "is said by all his biographers to have been born at North Colfingham, in Nottinghamshire, in 1648, but the registers of that parish...
Another 45 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Bloor Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Bloor migration to the United States +

Thousands of English families in this era began to emigrate the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. Although the passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe, those who made the voyage safely were rewarded with opportunities unavailable to them in their homeland. Research into passenger and immigration lists has revealed some of the very first Bloors to arrive in North America:

Bloor Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • James Bloor, who landed in America in 1762

Australia Bloor migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Bloor Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Bloor, English convict who was convicted in Chester, Cheshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Exmouth" on 3rd March 1831, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [7]
  • Mr. James Bloor, British convict who was convicted in Stafford, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Henry Tanner" on 27th June 1834, settling in New South Wales, Australia [8]
  • Mr. John Bloor, British Convict who was convicted in Stafford, Staffordshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Eden" on 12th March 1842, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Island) [9]
  • Miss Olive Bloor who was convicted in Derby, Derbyshire, England for 15 years, transported aboard the "Emma Eugenia" on 16th November 1843, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [10]
  • William Bloor, aged 26, a carpenter, who arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "Joseph Rowan" [11]

New Zealand Bloor migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Bloor Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Adam Bloor, British settler travelling from Portsmouth aboard the ship "Duke of Portland" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 13th October 1851 [12]
  • Mrs. Mary Bloor, British settler travelling from Portsmouth aboard the ship "Duke of Portland" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 13th October 1851 [12]
  • Miss Mary Bloor, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "New Great Britain" arriving in Bluff, Southland, South Island, New Zealand on 10th August 1863 [12]

Contemporary Notables of the name Bloor (post 1700) +

  • Edward William Bloor (b. 1950), American novelist and editor, best known for his young adult novels "Tangerine" and "London Calling"
  • Ella Reeve Bloor (1862-1951), American labor organizer and political radical, known as "Mother Bloor," a founder of the Communist Labor Party (1919)
  • Ella Reeve Bloor (1862-1951), American politician, Candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1918 [13]
  • Robert Bloor (d. 1846), English ceramist, probably born at Church Gresley, Derbyshire, where many of his family are buried [14]
  • John Stuart Bloor OBE (b. 1944), English business magnate, best known for reviving the Triumph Motorcycles name
  • Joseph Bloor (1789-1862), English-born, Canadian inkeeper, brewer, land speculator, founder the Village of Yorkville, eponym of Bloor Street, Toronto
  • Alan Bloor (b. 1943), British footballer
  • David Bloor (b. 1942), British professor at the University of Edinburgh
  • Ella Bloor Omholt, American politician, Candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, 1938; Candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 2nd District, 1940 [15]


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  7. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 25th May 2022). https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/exmouth
  8. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 7th January 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/henry-tanner
  9. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 15th December 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/eden
  10. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 31st March 2022). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/emma-eugenia
  11. ^ South Australian Register Saturday 17th June 1854. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Joseph Rowan 1854. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/josephrowan1854.shtml
  12. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  13. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  14. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 5 Feb. 2019
  15. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 27) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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