Home

Digital Products

Prints

Apparel

Home & Barware

Gifts


Customer Service



Belless History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms


Origins Available: English, Scottish


Belless is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Belless family lived in Durham, where they were established by the early Middle Ages.

Early Origins of the Belless family


The surname Belless was first found in Durham where they held a family seat. Belasius, a Norman Lord, attended William Duke of Normandy at Hastings in 1066 when King Harold was defeated. Belasius became General of William's forces against the remnant of the Saxon Army commanded by the Princes Edwin and Morcar in the famous siege of the Isle of Ely. Morton-Grange in Durham was home to a branch of the family. "This place formerly belonged to the family of Belasyse, to whom Cardinal Wolsey, in 1525, granted a lease of the manor and grange, and of whom was Sir William Belasyse, Knt., of Morton, High Sheriff of the county under the see of Durham from 1628 until his death in 1641." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
In later years. some of the family held a family seat at Worlaby in Lincolnshire. "This place, which is included in the duchy of Lancaster, was the seat of the Belasis family, one of whom, John, second son of the first Viscount Fauconberg, was lord of the treasury under James II., and was in 1644 created a Baron, of Worlaby, or Worletby; a title that became extinct on the death of his grandson without issue." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Belless family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Belless research.
Another 116 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1627, 1577, 1653, 1614, 1689, 1661, 1673, 1627, 1700, 1648, 1717, 1678, 1689, 1689, 1701, 1691 and 1692 are included under the topic Early Belless History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Belless Spelling Variations


Norman surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. The frequent changes in surnames are largely due to the fact that the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England, as well as the official court languages of Latin and French, also had pronounced influences on the spelling of surnames. Since medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings. The name has been spelled Bellsize, Belsize, Belasyse, Bellasise, Belasize, Bellasize, Belasise, Belasis and many more.

Early Notables of the Belless family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Charles Belasyse; Thomas Belasyse, 1st Baron & Viscount Fauconberg, 2nd Baronet (1577-1653), an English politician; John Belasyse, 1st Baron Belasyse PC (1614-1689), an English nobleman, soldier and Member of Parliament, Lord-Lieutenant of the East Riding of Yorkshire (1661-1673), Governor of Tangier...
Another 49 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Belless Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Belless family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Belless Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • John Belless, aged 22, a carpenter, who arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Marion" [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MARION 1851 - HER HISTORY. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1851Marion.htm

The Belless Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Bonne et belle assez
Motto Translation: Good and handsome enough.


Belless Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MARION 1851 - HER HISTORY. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1851Marion.htm

Sign Up