Bec History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Bec is an old Languedoc name. It comes from when the family lived in Languedoc included the southeastern portion of the Massif Central, a plateau in the south of France, and ran from the province of Rousillon, in the west, to the Rhône River, forming the border with Provence, in the east. Its capital was Toulouse. It was formed around the county of Toulouse. It was named after the language in use in the region. Langue d'oc means "the language that uses oc for yes," as opposed to the northern dialect, langue d'oïl, which means "the language that uses oïl for yes."

Early Origins of the Bec family

The surname Bec was first found in Languedoc, where the family were formerly seated.

"This great Norman house was divided into two branches, that gave their name to Bec-Crespin and Bec-en Caux, and claimed to descend from Duke Rollo's daughter Crispina, the wife of Grimaldi, Prince of Monaco. Other authorities derive them from Amfrid the Dane, whose son Turstin Goz is given as the common ancestor of the house of Avranches, Earls of Chester, and the Barons of Bec-Crespin, hereditary Constables of Normandy, and Castellans of Tillieres. " [1]

Early History of the Bec family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Bec research. Another 429 words (31 lines of text) covering the years 1234, 1271, 1292, 1307, 1529 and 1700 are included under the topic Early Bec History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bec Spelling Variations

The many different spellings of French surnames can be partially explained by the use of local dialects and by the influence of other languages during the early development of the French language. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name Bec is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Bes, Bès, Besse, Bèse, Bez, Bec, Bèce, Bècce, Besses, Bess, Best, Beste, Bèze, Baiz, Baize, Baise, Baisse, Baisses, Le Bes, Le Bès, Le Besse, Le Bèse, Le Bez, Le Bec, Le Bèce, Le Bècce, Le Besses, Le Bess, Le Best, Le Beste, Le Bet, Le Bett, Le Bette, De Bèze, De Baiz, De Baize, De Baise, De Baisse, De Baisses, De Bes, De Bès, De Besse, De Bèse, De Bez, De Bec, De Bèce, De Bècce, De Besses, De Bess, De Best, De Beste, De Bet, De Bett and many more.

Early Notables of the Bec family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Bec Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bec Ranking

In France, the name Bec is the 2,342nd most popular surname with an estimated 2,759 people with that name. [2]


New Zealand Bec migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Bec Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Charles W. Bec, South African settler travelling from Cape Town aboard the ship "Eveline" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 22nd January 1865 [3]

Contemporary Notables of the name Bec (post 1700) +

  • Bec Abbot, Canadian singer


The Bec Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Animi viam monstrat eis
Motto Translation: Just for fun way to show them


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  2. ^ http://www.journaldesfemmes.com/nom-de-famille/nom/
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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