Bauvend History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Bauvend is a name whose history on English soil dates back to the wave of migration that followed the Norman Conquest of England of 1066. The Bauvend family lived in Suffolk, where soon after the Norman Conquest, the village of Eston-Bavent was named after this illustrious family. Originally the name comes from the hamlet of Bavant (Bavent) in the Caen region of Normandy. [1]

Early Origins of the Bauvend family

The surname Bauvend was first found in Suffolk, where the family gave its name to the village of Eston-Bavent after the Conquest. The name was originally associated with the hamlet of Bavent in the Caen region of France.

"Picot de Bavet is entered as holding one knight's fee in Norfolk of William de Albini. It was derived from Bavent, lying on the Dive, a little south of Varaville, in Normandy." [2]

"Another Norfolk mesne-lord appears in the Liber Niger, Hubert de Baduent, an undertenant of the Honour of Rie. From him descended Adam de Bavent, who in the following century obtained through his wife a share of the estate of William de Wiston in Sussex, and was the father of another Adam, married to Alice de Scudamore. The latter had died before 1292, when the wardship of his son Roger was in dispute between the King and William de Say; and the contest was revived fourteen years afterwards by William's son Geoffrey; the young heir being then still under age. Roger de Bavent came from Sussex to the coronation of Edward II. " [2]

Peter Babyon, Babyo, or Babion ( fl. 1317-1366), was an English poet and divine in the reign of Edward II, by birth an Englishman. [3]

Early History of the Bauvend family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Bauvend research. Another 263 words (19 lines of text) covering the years 1086, 1216, 1272, 1273, 1272, 1307, 1273, 1500, 1619, 1626, 1559, 1559, 1552, 1586 and 1552 are included under the topic Early Bauvend History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bauvend Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Bavent, Baven, Bavin, Bauvent, Bavvent, Bavant and many more.

Early Notables of the Bauvend family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Walter de Bavent, a prominent 13th century landholder in Lincolnshire. William Bavand (fl. 1559), having been educated at Oxford, became a student in the Middle Temple, and published in 1559 'A work touching the...
Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Bauvend Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Bauvend family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick, poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Among early immigrants bearing the name Bauvend or a variant listed above were: Mary Bavin who arrived in Virginia in 1650 and Thomas Bavin in 1750.



  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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