Baling History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Baling reached English shores for the first time with the ancestors of the Baling family as they migrated following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Baling family lived in Lincolnshire and various other areas throughout Britain. The name of this family, however, does not refer to these areas, but to the French Channel port of "Boulogne."

Early Origins of the Baling family

The surname Baling was first found in various counties throughout Britain. The earliest listing of the name appears to be Gilebert de Bollon who was listed in Northumberland in 1168. [1]

Over one hundred years later, the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed: Pharamund de Boloynne in Buckinghamshire; Richard de Boloyne in Somerset; John de Boloyne in Cambridge; and Thomas Boloyne in Essex. [2] Interestingly, the rolls also listed Simon, Count of 'Buloyne' as residing in Oxford. In the reference "History of Norfolk," Simon de Boleyn was listed about the same time. [3]

Anne Boleyn (c. 1501-1536), Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of King Henry VIII, claimed descendancy from Geoffrey Boleyn (d. 1440), a yeoman of Salle, Norfolk.

Early History of the Baling family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Baling research. Another 94 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1406, 1463, 1440, 1451, 1505, 1501, 1507, 1536, 1533, 1536, 1480, 1538, 1504, 1536, 1499, 1543, 1477, 1539, 1603, 1576, 1550, 1554, 1454 and 1539 are included under the topic Early Baling History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Baling Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, Norman French and other languages became incorporated into English throughout the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Baling include Bullen, Bulen, Bullan, Bulloyne, Bouleyne, Bulleyn and many more.

Early Notables of the Baling family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Geoffrey Boleyn (1406-1463), Lord Mayor of London, son of Geoffrey Boleyn (d. 1440) yeoman of Salle, Norfolk; Sir William Boleyn (1451-1505), the son of Sir Geoffrey Boleyn, a wealthy mercer and Lord Mayor of London; Admiral Sir Charles Bullen; Anne Boleyn (c.1501 or 1507-1536), Queen of England (1533-1536), 1st Marquess of Pembroke, second wife of King Henry VIII; Elizabeth Boleyn (1480-1538), Countess of Wiltshire, mother of Anne Boleyn; George Boleyn (1504-1536), Viscount Rochford, brother of Anne, executed with her for incest, adultery and treason; Mary Boleyn (c.1499-1543), Anne's sister and a long-term...
Another 156 words (11 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Baling Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Baling family to Ireland

Some of the Baling family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 80 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Baling migration to the United States +

In England at this time, the uncertainty of the political and religious environment of the time caused many families to board ships for distant British colonies in the hopes of finding land and opportunity, and escaping persecution. The voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, though, and many arrived in North America sick, starved, and destitute. Those who did make it, however, were greeted with greater opportunities and freedoms that they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Early immigration records have shown some of the first Balings to arrive on North American shores:

Baling Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Baling, who landed in New York, NY in 1832 [4]

Australia Baling migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Baling Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century


The Baling Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: E Rege et victoria
Motto Translation: The King and victory.


  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Rye, Walter, A History of Norfolk. London: Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, 1885. Print
  4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  5. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 22nd March 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/coromandel-and-experiment


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